Mendel's law


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Mendel's law

(mĕn′dlz)
n.
1. One of two principles of heredity first formulated by Gregor Mendel, founded on his experiments with pea plants and stating that the members of a pair of homologous chromosomes segregate during meiosis and are distributed to different gametes. Also called law of segregation, principle of segregation.
2. The second of these two principles, stating that each member of a pair of homologous chromosomes segregates during meiosis independently of the members of other pairs, with the result that alleles carried on different chromosomes are distributed randomly to the gametes. Also called law of independent assortment, principle of independent assortment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mendel's laws are so effective in resolving questions that had baffled many a great mind before him that there was a powerful temptation to use these same laws to explain any resemblance whatsoever between related persons, including those resemblances that were not considered a priori to have any obvious biological foundation.
These attempts to apply Mendel's laws in such varied domains as anthropometry, physiology, psychology, or sociology received generous support and political backing at the highest level.
By 1900, the year that Mendel's laws resurfaced, the population of the world numbered 1.
The science of plant breeding, based on Mendel's laws - selecting desirable plants and crossbreeding them, then selecting and crossing again until the right combination of properties is achieved - is to older methods of plant improvement what a modern computer is to counting on your fingers and toes.
These methods are particularly interesting since they appear to show that genes and chromosomes are not equivalently passed on to the offspring as we always have believed from Mendel's laws of inheritance," Messing says.