memory

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memory

 [mem´o-re]
the mental faculty that enables one to retain and recall previously experienced sensations, impressions, information, and ideas. The ability of the brain to retain and to use knowledge gained from past experience is essential to the process of learning. Although the exact way in which the brain remembers is not completely understood, it is believed that a portion of the temporal lobe of the brain, lying in part under the temples, acts as a kind of memory center, drawing on memories stored in other parts of the brain.
impaired memory a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability to remember bits of information or behavioral skills.
immunologic memory the capacity of the immune system to respond more rapidly and strongly to a subsequent antigenic challenge than to the first exposure. See also memory cells and immune response.
long-term memory the aspect of memory in which knowledge is stored permanently, to be activated when cued; it is theoretically unlimited in capacity.
recent memory the ability to recall events from the immediate past.
remote memory the ability to recall events from the distant past.
screen memory a consciously tolerable memory serving to conceal or “screen” another memory that might be disturbing or emotionally painful if recalled.
short-term memory what one is conscious of at a given moment; in contrast to long-term memory it is of limited capacity (about seven items) and will be lost unless rehearsed and related to information in long-term memory.

mem·o·ry

(mem'ŏ-rē),
1. General term for the recollection of that which was earlier experienced or learned.
2. The mental information processing system that receives (registers), modifies, stores, and retrieves informational stimuli; composed of three stages: encoding, storage, and retrieval.
[L. memoria]

memory

/mem·o·ry/ (mem´o-re) that faculty by which sensations, impressions, and ideas are stored and recalled.
immunologic memory  anamnesis; the capacity of the immune system to respond more rapidly and strongly to subsequent antigenic challenge than to the first exposure.
remote memory  memory that is serviceable for events long past, but not able to acquire new recollections.
replacement memory  the replacing of one memory with another.
screen memory  a consciously tolerable memory serving to conceal another memory that might be disturbing or emotionally painful if recalled.
short-term memory  memory that is lost within a brief period (from a few seconds to a maximum of about 30 minutes) unless reinforced.

memory

(mĕm′ə-rē)
n.
1. The mental faculty of retaining and recalling past experience based on the mental processes of learning, retention, recall, and recognition.
2. Persistent modification of behavior resulting from experience.
3. The ability of the immune system to produce a specific secondary response to an antigen that has been previously encountered.

memory1

[mem′ərē]
Etymology: L, memoria
1 the mental faculty or power that enables one to retain and to recall, through unconscious associative processes, previously experienced sensations, impressions, ideas, concepts, and all information that has been consciously learned.
2 the reservoir of all past experiences and knowledge that may be recollected or recalled at will.
3 the recollection of a past event, idea, sensation, or previously learned knowledge. Kinds of memory include affect memory, anterograde memory, kinesthetic memory, long-term memory, screen memory, short-term memory, and visual memory. See also amnesia, déjà vu.

memory2

a nursing outcome from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) defined as the ability to cognitively retrieve and report previously stored information. See also Nursing Outcomes Classification.

memory

Immunology
An increase (“positive memory”) or decrease (“negative memory”) in the response of the immune system to an antigen after prior exposure.
 
Informatics
The data storage capacity of an electronic device or component, measured in RAM or ROM: RAM (random access memory) is that memory immediately available to the CPU, ranging to 1 gigabyte, which is “labile” and therefore lost when the device is turned off; ROM (read-only memory) is that memory which is “hard-wired” in specifically designed circuitry, comprising a form of permanent software.
 
Neurology
The persistence of the effects of learning and experiences on an organism’s behaviour, a process attributed to molecular transformation in incoming neuronal branches (dendritic trees).

Each neuron may receive as many as 200,000 signals, and since the sensory pattern probably stimulates relatively few sites on any “tree”, the numbers of patterns that may be stored are incalculable.

memory

Neurology The persistence of the effects of learning and experiences on an organism's behavior, a process attributed to molecular transformation in incoming neuronal branches–dendritic trees. See Emotional memory, Episodic memory, Long-term memory, Immediate memory, Procedural memory, Recent memory, Repressed memory, Semantic memory, Short-term memory, True memory, Visual memory, Working memory.

mem·o·ry

(mem'ŏ-rē)
1. Generally, recollection of that which was previously experienced or learned.
2. The mental information processing system that receives (registers), modifies, stores, and retrieves informational stimuli; composed of three stages: encoding, storage, and retrieval.

memory

The persistent effect on behaviour and thought of past experience. Short-term memory stores are small and the contents are soon lost unless repeatedly refreshed. Long-term memory stores are very large but are not always readily accessible. The physical basis of long-term memory has not yet been established, but most researchers seem to favour the circulating nerve impulse hypothesis rather than the idea of bit-coding by protein molecules.

memory

  1. the recollection of past events or previously learned skills after the passage of time.
  2. (in computing) the capacity of a computer usually expressed in ‘bytes’ or Ks, where K = 1024 bytes.

memory

short-term memory stores a limited amount of information for a short period of time (up to around 30 seconds); long-term memory lasts from over 30 seconds to many years; working memory a temporary memory store used for manipulating information in and out of short-term memory.

mem·o·ry

(mem'ŏ-rē)
1. General term for recollection of that which was earlier experienced or learned.
2. Mental information processing system that receives (registers), modifies, stores, and retrieves informational stimuli.

memory,

n 1. the ability to recall events, experiences, information, and skills.
n 2. a general term for a device that stores data in binary code on electronic or magnetic media in computers.
n 3. the ability of the immune system to greatly speed up the response to pathogens that have previously been encountered. See also immunity.
memory cycle,
n the time it takes to access a character in memory.
memory location,
n a place in the memory where a unit of data may be stored or retrieved.
memory, long-term,
n the ability to recall events, experiences, information, or skills that occurred or were acquired in the distant past.
memory register,
n a register in storage of a computer, in contrast with a register in one of the other units of the computer.
memory, short-term,
n the ability to retain and recall recent events or experiences.

memory

the capacity to recall previously experienced sensations, information, data and ideas.

brain memory
the ability of the brain to use knowledge gained from past experience. This is essential for the process of learning by animals. The process is poorly understood, but its practical application is sophisticated, especially in dogs.
memory cell
an expanded clone of small lymphocytes derived from stimulated antigen-sensitive B and T lymphocytes. They have antigen receptors of the same specificity as the parent cell. Important in the secondary immune response.
immunological memory
the ability of the immune system to respond to more strongly and rapidly to the second and subsequent exposures to an antigen.
suture memory
a property of some synthetic fibers which encourages the spontaneous untying of knots—the 'memory' of the fiber is that it is a straight fiber.

Patient discussion about memory

Q. What shall I give to eat for a good memory? My son forgets any given tasks very easily. With any given task either he will not complete the task or he will forget. His grandfather is having Alzheimer’s disease and I do not want him to suffer the same in his old age. What shall I give to eat for a good memory?

A. You can give him legumes, whole grains, green leafy vegetables, onions, almonds, salmon fish, sardine fish, berries, cherries, oranges, apples and plums. Reduction of diet rich in saturated fats after the age of 30 is also helpful. These foods provide with antioxidants, vitamins and good oils required for brain and its health. But don’t feed him with these foods only. Balanced diet plays a big role than anything else in this world. These are just supplements to support him not only for his brain but his whole body as well.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04lpBKfxasw&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/v04lpBKfxasw_brain_food?q=good%20memory%20diet&feature=player_embedded

Q. Which HERBAL medicine will increase my memory? I am reporter working for a familiar news channel with reputed name. The management trusts my words because I am very good in my memory. But for the past few months I am facing some memory loss and took some English medicine which is not much effective. So now I like to change my medication. Which HERBAL medicine will increase my memory?

A. Yes, Macska - I actually heard that that helps your memory a lot. Also math problems.

Q. Have food supplements like Ginkgo Biloba been proven to delay memory disorders?

A. Many people are interested in the health benefits of food supplements, hoping that natural substances can have the same efficacy as drugs. The answer to this specific question is NO. A recent study that was published after testing 3,000 people has shown no difference between those who took Ginkgo and those who didn’t. There is no food supplement, including Ginkgo Biloba that was scientifically proved to have the capacity to prevent or delay Dementia. Eating Romaine lattice, broccoli, cauliflower, and spinach have shown good results. Fish with Omega 3 have shown good results too.

More discussions about memory
References in periodicals archive ?
At Memry, we are always eager for the next innovation, and always ready to partner with customers on new nitinol applications.
Detailed information about Memry Corporation can be found at http://www.
Memry has demonstrated worldwide leadership in converting Nitinol wire, strip and tubing into a wide range of components for medical devices and other markets.
Memry Corporation and Subsidiaries Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income For the Three Months Ended September 30, 2007 and 2006 (Unaudited) Three Months Ended September 30, 2007 2006 Revenues $13,830,000 $13,830,000 Cost of revenues 8,998,000 8,107,000 Gross profit 4,832,000 5,723,000 Operating expenses Research and development 654,000 493,000 General, selling and administration 3,354,000 3,260,000 Amortization of intangible assets 126,000 126,000 Other (11,000) (17,000) 4,123,000 3,862,000 Operating income 709,000 1,861,000 Interest Expense (23,000) (306,000) Income 26,000 92,000 3,000 (214,000) Income before income taxes 712,000 1,647,000 Provision for income taxes 288,000 632,000 Net income $424,000 $1,015,000 Net income per common share Basic $0.
Tulumaris, who has served as president and chief operating officer of Memry since May 2006, has more than 20 years experience in manufacturing and operations and has a solid background in ISO and cGMP.
Earlier this year we introduced our ultra-small diameter V2 tubing, so with these two distinct brands we feel that Memry is well-positioned to offer some of the widest range of tubing sizes, surface finishes and tolerances supplied to the medical device industry.
Memry CFO Rick Sowerby added, "The company continues to be a strong cash generator.
For more information, contact Memry Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer Richard F.
In connection with the settlement agreements, Memry and SAES Getters have agreed to amend the merger agreement entered into on June 24, 2008 to permit Memry to enter into the settlement agreements.
Throughout this period of strategic investments to strengthen our pipeline and build our company, Memry has remained a strong cash generator.
Exposure at our conference and Julie's initiation of research coverage led to investor awareness and for Memry the acquisition of the company.
Memry Corporation CEO Robert Belcher will give a 25-minute presentation on the company's history, products, financial performance and prospects at 11 a.