meme

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meme

Psychology
A unit of experience that forms the basis for decisions or thought processes.

Social medicine
An idea, behaviour or style that spreads from person to person within a culture.

meme

Neurology A block of mental cues associated with experience, which relies on the brain's 'pattern-evolving machinery' Psychology A thought construct that endows a person with certainty about his/her fate. See Mediational unit.
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He explained the common denominator seen in memes can be anything as small as "something that many people find humorous, such as a grumpy cat and other cat memes, or as large as referring to a social issue faced by many people, as in the case of the famous 'yeh bik gayi hai gormint (government)' lady from Pakistan.
For as flippant as many memes may be, there are others that speak to surprisingly heavy social issues.
While I have used social media to a large degree in my teaching and collaboration, my use of memes has been relegated to icebreakers or as visual punctuation to make a point during presentations at professional development sessions, and they always work.
Keanu Reeves is well aware of his Sad Keanu meme and his official response: "I mean, do I wish I didn't get my picture taken while I was eating a sandwich on the streets of New York?
Los memes de internet se alteran deliberadamente [.
Memes that spoof mainstream advertisements, such as this one featuring "The Most Interesting Man in the World," a concept that began as a commerical for Dos Equis beer, can do as much or more for brand awareness as the original ad.
Lors des 6 premiers mois de cette annee, le nombre de greves a augmente de 6% en comparaison avec la meme periode de l'annee ecoulee.
The post The enduring power of memes appeared first on Executive Magazine.
Memes are the primary driving force for the development of human intellect, replicate within the environment of human behavior using human imitative behavior, and are extremely compliant to experimental manipulation.
Instead it's an insightful story, told with the aid of easily understood memes that appeal to our commonsense instincts about the role religion has played in our history.
Are memes a "gateway drug" that can introduce disaffected digitally savvy youth to social movements where they might get hooked on more substantial and meaningful forms of activism?