chromatophore

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Related to Melanophores: Iridophores, Xanthophores

chromatophore

 [kro-mat´o-for]
any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.

chro·mat·o·phore

(krō-mat'ō-fōr),
1. A colored plastid, due to the presence of chlorophyll or other pigments, found in certain forms of protozoa.
2. Melanophage; a pigment-bearing phagocyte found chiefly in the skin, mucous membrane, and choroid coat of the eye, and also in melanomas.
3. Synonym(s): chromophore
4. A colored plastid in plants, for example, chloroplasts, leukoplasts, etc.
[chromato- + G. phoros, bearing]

chromatophore

/chro·mato·phore/ (-for) any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.

chromatophore

(krō-măt′ə-fôr′)
n.
1. Any of several types of pigment cells, especially one found in a fish, amphibian, or reptile.
2. A multicellular organ in cephalopods that contains pigment cells.
3. A specialized pigment-bearing organelle in certain photosynthetic bacteria.

chro·mat·o·phore

(krō-mat'ō-fōr)
1. A plastid, colored because of the presence of chlorophyll or other pigments, found in certain forms of protozoa.
2. Melanophage; a pigment-bearing phagocyte found chiefly in the skin, mucous membrane, and choroid coat of the eye, and also in melanomas.
3. Synonym(s): chromophore.
4. A colored plastid in plants (e.g., chloroplasts, leukoplasts).
[chromato- + G. phoros, bearing]

chromatophore

A pigment-containing cell.

chromatophore

  1. (also called chromoplast) a pigmented PLASTID of plant cells which may be green due to the presence of chlorophyll or differently coloured because of the presence of CAROTENOID pigments. CHROMATOPHORES are often CHLOROPLASTS in which the pigment has broken down, as in the ripening of fruit.
  2. (in animals) a cell with pigment in the cytoplasm which can be dispersed or concentrated so changing the colour of the animal as a whole. Animals with this characteristic include frogs, chameleons, cephalopods.
  3. (in photosynthetic bacteria and CYANOBACTERIA) a membranous structure carrying photosynthetic pigments.

chromatophore

any pigmentary cell or color-producing plastid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The principal elements of the larval pigment pattern are the presence of melanophores situated anteriorly on the lower jaw, dorsally and ventrally on the gut, in a single row on the ventral margin of the tail, and on the pectoral fins, especially distally (Table 4, Fig.
After incubation with drugs treatment for 1 h, the melanophores with different levels of pigment aggregation was evaluated by cells counting under an inverted microscope (Leica, Germany) and the extent of pigment dispersion was scored as aggregated, partially dispersed, or fully dispersed according to the melanophore index (M.
Pigmentation of larvae after hatch consisted of melanophores concentrated on the ventral surface of the yolk sac, as well as posterior to the anus both on ventral and dorsal areas along the myomeres.
The researchers found that in fish with jaguar mutations, black melanophores circle yellow pigment cells but don't move away from them.
pigment distributed symmetrically above and below central axis of caudal peduncle), in having melanophores outlining the anterior lateral-line scales (vs.
3A-D); whereas treatment with acetylcholine, which induces the aggregation of melanosomes in the melanophores of some fish species belonging to the family Siluridae (order Siluri-formes) (15, 16), did not affect the chromatophores (data not shown).
Both males and females have irregular markings on ventral parts of the body; some females have the venter almost immaculate; there is a tendency for melanophores to concentrate on borders of lips and medial-anterior part of throat, in a heart-shaped pattern.
The melanophores turn dark when illuminated and light in darkness; they probably function as camouflage, says Foster.
The Non-identity of the Neurohumours for the Melanophores and Xanthophores of Fundulus.
Morphological changes differ from physiological changes in that morphological changes are distinguished by a gradual accumulation of pigment and melanophores over a period of time (Waring 1963).