Meige syndrome

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Meige syndrome

A movement disorder characterised by blepharospasm, oromandibular dystonia, and sometimes spasmodic dysphonia.

Meige syndrome

Neurology A movement disorder characterized by blepharospasm, oromandibular dystonia, sometimes spasmodic dysphonia, See Blepharospasm.

Meige syndrome

(mēg, mĕzh)
[Henri Meige, French physician, 1866–1940]
A dystonic movement disorder that can involve dry eyes and excessive eye blinking, with involuntary movements of the jaw muscles, neck, lips, and tongue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meige's syndrome is a kind of focal dystonia disease, and it was first reported by French neurologist Meige in 1910.
Meige's syndrome usually starts to appear when people are 50 to 60, but there are teenage patients as well.
Primary Meige's syndrome's nosogenesis is unclear; while secondary Meige's syndrome could be related to the upper brain stem and abnormal basal ganglia dopamine receptor hypersensitivity, the hyperactive cholinergic nervous system (e.
Currently, the drugs for Meige's syndrome include anticholinergics (e.
The temporal relationship was clear, so Nitrazepam and Olanzapine were suspected to aggravate Meige's syndrome.
Using antipsychotics drugs for a long period of time could cause eyelid spasm, which is secondary Meige's syndrome.
Below, a patient who developed Meige's syndrome due to quetiapine augmentation to lithium and tardive blepharospasm due to olanzapine augmentation to lithium at different episodes of the illness is presented.
Fukui H, Murai T Marked Improvement of Meige's syndrome with olanzapine in a schizophrenic patient.
Blepharospasm can occur in isolation or as part of other conditions, such as Meige's syndrome.