functional food

(redirected from Medicinal food)
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functional food

a food purported or proven to have a beneficial health effect.
See also: designer food, phytochemicals, biochemopreventives, nutraceutical.

functional food

A natural or processed food that contains known biologically active compounds which, when in defined quantitative and qualitative amounts, provides a clinically proven health benefit, and thus is useful in preventing, managing and treating chronic diseases.

func·tion·al food

(fŭngk'shŭn-ăl fūd)
Foodstuff demonstrated to confer physiologic benefits, reduce the risk of chronic disease, or act as a nutrient.
Compare: nutraceutical

functional food

1. Food products with additives for which, following FDA approval, health claims can be made.
2. A food that has a defined health benefit for the person who consumes it.
See also: food
References in periodicals archive ?
Garlic has long been considered a medicinal food and was used by monks in the Middle Ages to protect against plague
A full manuscript of the study has been published in The Journal of Medicinal Food, and a study abstract may be found on the PubMed site.
reference 2: Journal of Medicinal Food JMedFood 15 (8) 2012, 753-757 Effect of Spirulina Maxima on Postprandial Lipemia in Young Runners.
Results from a Chinese study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, show that Reishi can beneficially boost the body's energy levels and promote a healthy immune response.
The Journal of Medicinal Food published a report by researchers at the University of Georgia which revealed that common spices not only confer antioxidant benefits, but offer significant protection against the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs).
Sources: Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry, 2008; 56: 9905-9910; and Journal of Medicinal Food, 2000; 3:159.
New study results on Embria Health Sciences' EpiCor ingredient have been published online in the Journal of Medicinal Food (Jensen, Gitte, S.
According to a report published in Journal of Medicinal Food, chemicals found in cranberry products called proanthocyanidins (PACs) prevent E.
Chemopreventive effects of pomegranate seed oil on skin tumor development in CD1 mice," Journal of Medicinal Food, October 2003.
The study, "A comparison of pectin, polyphenols, and phytosterols, alone or in combination, to lovastatin for reduction of serum lipids in familial hypercholesterolemic swine" is available from the Journal of Medicinal Food.
According to Vladimir Badmaev, MD, PhD, head of R&D at NattoPharma ASA, Oslo, Norway, "The most popular categories of medicinal food address aging populations and wasting conditions like muscle wasting or sarcopenia, bone rarefaction or osteoporosis, health conditions caused by insufficient status of vitamins and minerals and gastrointestinal dysbiotic conditions.