medico

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Related to Medici: Machiavelli, Lorenzo Medici

medico

(mĕd′ĭ-kō′)
n. pl. medi·cos Informal
1. A physician.
2. A medical student.
References in periodicals archive ?
MediciGlobal's clinical trial recruitment practices are guided by global standards and by a concern for the lives of the patients who put their trust in the Medici team.
This emphasis on spectacle, wealth and familial pride stamps the glorious Medici portraits that punctuate this display.
The number of FHA insurance claims rose by 10 percent, Medici said, during the one-year period from fiscal year 2007 to fiscal year 2008.
Giovanni was always Lorenzo's man, acting diplomatically for him and Florence as the Medici bank's representative in Venice and later, as his city's envoy in Naples and Rome, continuing to operate the now-familiar double diplomacy by reporting separately to the Signoria and Lorenzo, who on one occasion ordered him for prudence's sake to write at more length to the government "a little better to satisfy their appetite" (261).
Lorenzo was the nephew of Giovanni di Lorenzo de' Medici, who was elected Pope Leo X in 1513.
Harness supplies detailed information on the variety of media utilised by the Medici women, allowing the reader to appreciate the character of such methods, and evaluates the motivation behind these choices.
Leonie Frieda sets out to show that such judgments were mistaken and bigoted and that Catherine de Medici was, in fact, a remarkably courageous and pragmatic woman whose sole purpose in life was to ensure "the survival of her children, her dynasty and France".
2) Ercole II took particular pride in his family's antiquity and was enraged by the political maneuvers of the parvenu, Cosimo I, to establish Medici dynastic precedence in Italy.
Lorella Medici, the group's manager, said the annual exhibition had never been so popular since it began in 1995.
The Medici family dominated Florence and its mediaeval Republic and eventually spread its influence through much of Europe.
BETWEEN 1537 AND 1621, the first four Medici grand dukes of Florence--Cosimo I, his sons Francesco I and Ferdinando I, and his grandson Cosimo II--presided over a spectacular flowering of the arts and sciences, exemplified by the pioneering achievements and dominant legacy of Michelangelo.