medical school

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medical school

A formal education programme (four years in the US; prerequisite four years of undergraduate education) which is generally divided into two years of basic sciences (e.g., anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, etc.) and two years of clinical sciences, in which students have courses that combine lectures with hands-on learning experience in a hospital setting in Ob/Gyn, surgery, psychiatry, etc.

medical school

Graduate education A period of formal education–4 yrs in the US, prerequisite 4 yrs of undergraduate education, generally divided into 2 yrs of basic sciences–eg, anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, etc, and 2 yrs of clinical sciences in which students have courses that combine lectures with hands-on learning experience in a hospital setting in OB, surgery, psychiatry, etc. See International medical graduate, Offshore medical school.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to its plan, the ministry will close the nursing departments of vocational medical schools and only graduates from four-year nursing programs in universities will be able to be employed as nurses.
The medical school opened in 1970 with a class of 16.
There is little literature, however, on using tutorless groups in medical school.
After supporting the concept of the exam, the American Medical Association adopted a policy stating that doctor-patient communications testing should be done by medical schools, not the licensing examination.
We know at the first blush last year Sudbury got an influx of 18 or 19 physicians who, because of the medical school, decided to get in on the ground floor," says Thunder Bay Mayor Ken Boshcoff, who helped rally forces from the northwestern business, political, academic, medical and First Nations communities to push Queen's Park for the dualcampus model.
They're used to their soft, supple skin, but it's really tough on the cadaver,'' said Rudin, who will finish medical school in June and plans to specialize in orthopedics.
At one exclusive university, 450 of 1,200 entering students declared themselves to be "premed"; four years later, only 100 remained, of whom about half would ultimately secure admission to a medical school.
UC medical schools no longer publish general breakdowns of admissions by ethnic group, MCAT scores, and GPA, though prospective students can still get estimates of their likelihood of admission by giving officials their ethnicity, scores, and GPA over the phone.
Because medical schools rely on federal grants for more than 20 percent of their revenues, going after such funding has become a top priority.
Medical schools and teaching hospitals also generated more than $20 billion in state tax revenue in 2005 through income and sales taxes, corporate income taxes, and capital stock/franchise taxes paid by businesses that collect revenue from these institutions.
Today virtually every medical school in the United States and abroad includes interviewing and communication skills as part of its curriculum.

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