medical illustrator

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medical illustrator

an artist who creates visual material designed to record and communicate medical, biological, and related knowledge. A medical illustrator requires a strong foundation in biology, anatomy, physiology, pathology, general medicine, and the visual arts. Today most medical illustrators use a computer to create their work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of the films were made by the medical illustration department for use in teaching and several of the films feature work by surgeons and consultants.
He practiced medical illustration from the late 1930s until the end of his life.
This gave her the qualifications required to embark on a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Illustration.
Besides medical illustration panel exhibits, there are many other forms of customized visuals that may be created for use at mediation, trial and other legal actions.
You can do a foundation degree in medical illustration which is a good introduction to this field of work and leads to professional membership of the Institute of Medical Illustrators (IMI).
You can do a foundation degree in medical illustration which leads to professional membership of the Institute of Medical Illustrators (IMI).
Studying photography at Glasgow Metropolitan, Andrew enrolled in the college's medical illustration degree course, which is run in conjunction with Glasgow Caledonian University.
Komal first learned about the field of medical illustration while taking a class called Health Occupations in her freshman year of high school.
After attaining a first-class degree from Nottingham University she pursued a multi-disciplinary design career, working across the private, public and voluntary sectors in areas as diverse as set design for theatre and television to medical illustration.
So an instructor who noticed he had a flare for drawing and painting suggested he get into medical illustration.
He serves as an unpaid consultant in medical illustration, has written a pamphlet on people with disabilities at worship, volunteers at the National MS Society's Massachusetts Chapter, and is an outspoken advocate for people with disabilities.
Once the program begins, in about a year, students will be able to study such subjects as computer animation, medical illustration and CD-ROM design.

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