medical student debt

(redirected from Medical School Debt)
The amount of financial obligations or monies owed—with accruing interest—to various parties by a medical student, usually understood to mean at the time of graduation from medical school

medical student debt

The amount of financial obligations or monies owed with (accruing) interest to various parties by a medical student
References in periodicals archive ?
It is really unusual for residents to be recognized nationally and with a significant honorarium to pursue personal causes and to repay medical school debt.
Physicians are expensive to train, hire and retain, and the median medical school debt now stands at $170,000.
A Connecticut resident, Elizabeth Gott, said last week she decided to sell the ball on behalf of her 30-year-old son, Michael, so he could use the proceeds to pay off his medical school debt.
I RECENTLY READ A STORY ABOUT A family whose son is struggling to pay off nearly $200,000 in medical school debt.
More than 100 Texas doctors made a deal with the state: For four years, they would practice in underserved communities and treat the neediest patients - in return for having their medical school debt forgiven.
They also needed help in paying off medical school debt and hoped to practice in a fairly modern clinic where they could do a full spectrum of family medicine, including operative obstetrics.
Young doctors saddled with medical school debt are more often drawn to such lucrative specialties as radiology or anesthesiology in big cities or suburban areas, where they can earn double the $120,000 to $140,000 salary of a rural family practitioner.
We support the effort to increase training of primary care physicians and the recognition that medical school debt relief is critically needed.
Factors cited for the increasing preference for non-primary care specialties include high medical school debt, low insurance payments for office visits (when compared with various simple procedures), difficulty caring for the chronically ill and elderly with complex diseases (especially with the need to see so many patients per hour), and excessive amounts of paperwork.
Shoring up the primary care workforce will require an increase in payments for primary care services, and emphasis on primary care in graduate medical education funding, and the creation of programs that would allow primary care physicians to eliminate their medical school debt, he said.
It will also address the difficulties in hand-offs between pediatric and adult medicine specialists when patients with chronic illnesses reach adulthood, as well as on workforce issues and medical school debt.
I understand the pressures of medical school debt and loans, starting a new family, and moving to a new area, but a longer term view of one's career and mental health is in order.

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