medical examiner


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Related to medical examiner: Forensic pathologist

med·i·cal ex·am·in·er (ME),

1. a physician who examines a person and reports on that person's physical condition to the company or individual at whose request the examination was made.
2. in states or municipalities where the office of coroner has been abolished, a physician appointed to investigate all cases of sudden, violent, or suspicious death.

medical examiner

n.
1. A physician, usually a pathologist, who is officially authorized to determine the cause of suspicious or unusual deaths.
2. A physician who performs physical examinations to determine whether people are healthy enough to perform certain roles, such as military service, or whether people qualify for life insurance or disability compensation.

medical examiner

See coroner.

medical examiner

Forensics-US
A medical doctor (MD or DO) appointed by a particular jurisdiction (usually a State) as a public official whose chief role is to investigate and provide official interpretation regarding the manner and possible cause(s) of unexplained deaths, a conclusion that may be reached by performing postmortem examinations on decedents.

medical examiner

Forensic medicine A medical doctor–MD or DO–who performs postmortem examinations on decedents; MEs are public officials appointed by a particular jurisdiction–usually a state whose chief responsibility is to investigate and provide official interpretation regarding the manner and possible cause(s) of unexplained deaths. See Forensic pathology. Cf Coroner.

med·i·cal ex·am·i·ner

(ME) (med'i-kăl eg-zam'in-ĕr)
1. A physician who examines a person and reports on that person's physical condition to the company or individual at whose request the examination was made.
2. In states or municipalities where the office of coroner has been abolished, a physician appointed to investigate all cases of sudden, violent, or suspicious death.

med·i·cal ex·am·i·ner

(ME) (med'i-kăl eg-zam'in-ĕr)
1. Physician who examines a person and reports on that person's physical condition to the company or individual at whose request the examination was made.
2. In jurisdictions where coroner's office has been abolished, physician appointed to investigate all cases of sudden, violent, or suspicious death.
References in periodicals archive ?
I'm also substituting for the last 30 months for morgue assistants in other districts with no travel expenses paid," he said in his letter, adding that the medical examiners exploit the system by claiming 2-3 times the amount of overtime.
National Association of Medical Examiners inspection and accreditation checklist, 2nd revision.
Then the medical examiner will authorize us to move the body.
According to NAME, a single medical examiner should perform no more than 250 autopsies per year.
This demonstrates for investigators the importance of gathering other information to assist medical examiners in determining the proper cause of death when drowning is suspected.
Watching the naked and injured body of the dead over the shoulder of cops and medical examiners is a second violation of this unprotected flesh, a final invasion of privacy.
During the autopsy, the medical examiner found that Avryonna had a skull fracture.
Al Sharpton that celebrated the homicide ruling issued Friday by the city medical examiner.
Prosecutor Nawaf Hamza said the allegations were being investigated and the complainants referred to a medical examiner.
The medical examiner typically takes jurisdiction of approximately 35 percent to 40 percent of those cases, fewer than a dozen of which are likely to involve homicide (in an average year).
The eight-year-old Brooklyn boy who was kidnapped and murdered by Levi Aron last week had been drugged before being killed, according to a medical examiner in the case.
Chief medical examiner for a Georgia county, Hanzlick (forensic pathology, Emory U.

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