mechanism of injury


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

mechanism of injury

the circumstance in which an injury occurs, for example, sudden deceleration, wounding by a projectile, or crushing by a heavy object.

mechanism of injury

Abbreviation: MOI
The manner in which a physical injury occurred (e.g., fall from a height, ground-level fall, high- or low-speed motor vehicle accident, ejection from a vehicle, vehicle rollover). The MOI is used to estimate the forces involved in trauma and, thus, the potential severity for wounding, fractures, and internal organ damage that a patient may suffer as a result of the injury.
See also: mechanism
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding the mechanism of injury provides insight into ways to decrease the prevalence and severity of GU trauma.
Salter-Harris I and II fractures of the distal tibia: Does mechanism of injury relate to premature physeal closure?
34%) 0 0 Total 15 (100%) 30 (100%) 15 (100%) Table-7: Mechanism of injury Mechanism of Injury Conservative Operative Total Flexion CF 6 (40%) 9 (60%) 15 (50%) DF Extension CF 5 (33.
Fracture site depends upon mechanism of injury magnitude and direction of impact force prominence of mandible and anatomy of site.
The coding of a fall injury requires assignment of codes for the diagnosis (body part and injury type), mechanism of injury, patient's activity at the time of the fall and the place of occurrence.
Among children transported by EMS with a matched hospital record available, there were major differences in injury severity and hospital interventions by mechanism of injury.
Demographic data and the mechanism of injury for each patient are summarised in Table 1.
The mechanism of injury reported varies from region to region, depicting the type of trauma received.
Evidence is insufficient to advise patients with TBI or their health care providers about other risk factors for depression, including age, gender, area of brain injured, or mechanism of injury.
The most common mechanism of injury was involvement in a road traffic accident [1, 3].
Given the mechanism of injury, the unilaterality of symptoms, and the patient's lack of response to nasal steroids, it was thought that the VMR was due to the earlier traumatic injury, which had resulted in imbalance of the autonomic neural input.
But that doesn't make sense, since it is more likely that different areas would be affected in each person because of differences in anatomy, vulnerability to injury and mechanism of injury.