McMurray test


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Mc·Mur·ray test

(măk-mŭr'ē),
rotation of the tibia on the femur to determine injury to meniscal structures.

McMurray test

A clinical manoeuvre used to identify a torn meniscus.

Method
The patient lies on his or her back with the knee completely flexed. The examiner rotates the foot fully outward while slowly extending the knee: a painful click in outward rotation indicates a torn medial meniscus; a painful click in inward rotation indicates a torn lateral meniscus.

Mc·Mur·ray test

(mik-mŭr'ē test)
Rotation of the tibia on the femur to determine injury to meniscal structures.

McMurray,

Thomas Porter, English surgeon, 1887-1949.
McMurray knife
McMurray maneuver
McMurray osteotomy
McMurray sign
McMurray test - rotation of the tibia on the femur.
References in periodicals archive ?
1993) evaluated 104 consecutive patients for the accuracy of the McMurray test for the diagnosis of meniscal tear and also looked at the inter-examiner reliability in performing the test.
This had a bearing on the sensitivity, increasing it to 90% when both tests were positive, however the specificity and diagnostic accuracy were not significantly affected by the addition of a positive McMurray test.
KKU knee compression rotation test for detection of meniscal tears: a comparative study of its diagnostic accuracy with McMurray test.
A Lachman test, Drawer sign, and McMurray test are useful in diagnosing the presence of internal ligamentous injuries without MRI, and an ultrasound can help to detect knee effusion when it is not clinically obvious.
The McMurray test is best for ruling in meniscal pathology.
The McMurray test performed best, but at 9% to 11% pretest probability of meniscal lesions, based on prevalence estimates among primary care/specialist populations, (2) the posttest probability of a positive exam is still <30%.
A meta-analysis of 4 studies by Jackson compared the utility of the McMurray test and joint line tenderness.
As also shown in a recent meta-analysis, (1) no test including examining for joint line tenderness or for joint effusion, the medial-lateral grind test, or McMurray test is of value for determining meniscal tears.
There is little evidence that the diagnosis of meniscal lesions of the knee can be improved by applying the assessment of joint effusion, the McMurray test, joint line tenderness, or the Apley compression test.
The summary receiver operating characteristic curves of the assessment of joint effusion, the McMurray test, and joint line tenderness indicated little discriminative power for these tests.
Scholten and coworkers looked at the sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of diagnostic accuracy for estimating joint effusion, joint line tenderness, and the McMurray test.
Reading up from 50% of the "prior probability" of meniscus damage on the x-axis, if the McMurray test result is positive, the probability moves only to 70% (read off the y-axis); if negative, it drops only to 35%.