McCollough effect


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McCollough effect

A phenomenon observed by those who have worked for a prolonged period with a computer monitor that displays green lettering on a darkened background, who find that white paper acquires a pink hue.

The effect is caused by adaptation of cortical neurons to specific combinations of colour and form; it may last for several weeks and is of no clinical significance.

McCollough effect

A phenomenon observed by persons who have worked for a prolonged period with a computer monitor that displays green lettering on a darkened background, who find that white paper acquires a pink hue. See Video display unit.
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In the McCollough effect, subjects move their eyes over a horizontal grid of alternating black and green bars, as well as a vertical grid of alternating purple and black bars.
The optical illusions for the Hermann grid, McCollough effect, and waterfall illusion could also be used to teach younger high school students about experimental design.
Topics include an introduction to spatio-chromatic interactions, neural adjustments to chromatic blur, color contrast influences in perceiving shape, Fechner-Benham subjective colors and McCollough effects, cone contrast computations, surface interpolation, lightness and illumination in terms of gradients, a neural model of surface perception, and two contributions on the watercolor illusion.