maximum lifespan

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maximum lifespan

1. The age of the oldest known member of a species.
2. The theoretical age that any organism, drug, or structure can survive intact. The term is sometimes used in geriatrics for the maximum lifespan potential of an individual or, in pharmacology, for the effective shelf life of a drug.
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Probably the maximum life span, if you retain your health to enjoy life, as a human being, is still not much more than 100 years old," he said.
In contrast, life span is a specifically individual concept, and thus, the maximum life span is an upper bound value rather than an average value.
The project would have a maximum life span of 50 years.
Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA is inversely related to maximum life span in the heart and brain of mammals.
When combined with the fact that 1) the products of lipid peroxidation are powerful reactive molecular species, and 2) that fatty acids differ dramatically in their susceptibility to peroxidation, membrane fatty acid composition provides a mechanistic explanation of the variation in maximum life span among animal species.
Brimming with radiant health, compelling conversation, and high energy, Kekich is the author of Smart, Strong and Sexy at 100, a how-to guide that summarizes evidence-based medical research into remedies for aging, along with action plans for cultivating optimum health and maximum life span.
The maximum life span of a TRO it has allowed the lower courts to issue is 60 days.
A study to determine differences in maximum life span is ongoing: While none of the untreated mice lived longer than about 3 years, some of the female mice that overproduced FGF21 were still alive at nearly 4 years, the researchers report.
This age represents a considerable increase in the known maximum life span for M.
Most synthetics have a three- to five-year maximum life span with limited oxygen permeation, so these big reds then have the opportunity to soften up and are ready to consume when the consumer pulls the cork.
However, if you live the average American lifestyle, "you may never reach your potential maximum life span," says Dan Buettner, author of The Blue Zones.

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