Arnold

(redirected from Matthew Arnold)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Ar·nold

(ar'nŏld),
Friedrich, German anatomist, 1803-1890. See: Arnold bundle, Arnold canal, Arnold ganglion, Arnold nerve, Arnold tract, foramen of Arnold.

Ar·nold

(ar'nŏld),

Arnold, Friedrich

Etymology: German anatomist, 1803-1890
an investigator of structures and functions of the brain and nervous system, including the nerve center of the cough reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Graham Moore, director of P2 Technologies, said: "We are delighted to be working with Matthew Arnold and Baldwin.
To this extent they were sympathetic, but because the initial aesthetic response faltered, the connection of Leopardi's poetry to Italian patriotism proved difficult, undermining the reception and understanding of historical mediation until the arrival of Matthew Arnold.
I confess to having some irrelevant mnemonic responses from the time I had a fractured tibia in an automobile accident in 1979, but the entire effect of the movie did not leave me with a positive semantic reaction for the reasons explained by Matthew Arnold.
Grob corrects previous readings of Arnold, chiefly those of A Dwight Culler's Imaginative Reason: The Poetry of Matthew Arnold (1966) and David Riede's Matthew Arnold and the Betrayal of Language (1988).
Like Trilling, Alexander is an English professor and critic; both began as scholars of the Victorian period, and both published book-length studies of Matthew Arnold early in their careers.
He took Matthew Arnold to task for proposing the idea and did battle with those who would reduce literature to historical information, to logical positivism.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 311: Matthew Arnold.
Paul: it may turn out that Matthew Arnold was right.
I was working in my office at Royal Military College, immersed in the poetry of Matthew Arnold and Victorian England.
This far exceeded our expectations," says Matthew Arnold, senior vice president and chief operating officer of World Resources.
Set against scenes like these, in which physical assault serves as a metaphor for removing the threat posed by religious Dissent to the Victorian body politic--by the simple means of force and exclusion--the calm and civility that Matthew Arnold exhibits in his famous comments on Dissenters in Culture and Anarchy (1869) present, to say the least, a sharp contrast.
The poet Matthew Arnold wrote that we all desire "not to be loved, but to be loved alone.