theorem

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Related to Mathematical theorem: mathematical proof, Mathematical theory

the·o·rem

(thē'ŏ-rem),
A proposition that can be tested, and can be established as a law or principle.
See also: law, principle, rule.

theorem

[thē′ərəm]
Etymology: Gk, theorein, to look at
1 a proposition to be proved by a chain of reasoning and analysis.
2 a rule expressed by symbols or formulae.

the·o·rem

(thē'ŏ-rĕm)
A proposition that can be proved, and so is established as a law or principle.
See also: law, principle, rule

the·o·rem

(thē'ŏ-rĕm)
Proposition that can be tested then and can be established as a law or principle.

theorem (thē´ərəm),

n 1. a proposition to be proved by a chain of reasoning and analysis.
2. a proven proposition used in the solution of a more advanced problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ferguson's dusty basement studio is filled with the results of his dialogues between materials and mathematical theorems -- sculpted geometrical forms that go by exotic names: Klein bottles, trefoil knots, cross-caps, horned spheres and tori.
The fallacy in Rousseau's reasoning is that, unlike mathematical theorems, salutary social practices typically are not susceptible to step-by-step rational analysis.
Other mathematicians have knitted or crocheted fractal objects, surfaces that have no inside or outside, and shapes whose patterns display mathematical theorems.
This textbook for advanced students and practicing engineers avoids extensive mathematical theorems and instead focuses on the application QFT to real-world problems.
Men propound mathematical theorems in beleaguered cities, conduct metaphysical arguments in condemned cells, make jokes on scaffolds.
Her hobbies are archery, flute, programming calculators and working out proofs for mathematical theorems.
Climbing sheer rock faces demands the most of a person; so too does proving complex mathematical theorems.