Massachusetts Male Aging Study


Also found in: Acronyms.

Massachusetts Male Aging Study

A cross-sectional survey of ± 1700 men, aged 40–69, sampled from the Boston metropolitan area, which evaluated characteristics of andropause (“male menopause”). According to the study, features of andropause include erectile and vasomotor disturbances, increased fatigue, insomnia, decreased testosterone, and increased luteinising hormone.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Performance of Massachusetts Male Aging Study (MMAS) and androgen deficiency in the aging male (ADAM) questionnaires in the prediction of free testosterone in patients aged 40 years or older treated in outpatient regimen.
Impotence and its medical and psychosical correlates: Results of the Massachusetts Male Aging Study.
The questionable physiologic and epidemiologic basis for a male climacteric syndrome: Preliminary results from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study.
The Massachusetts Male Aging Study is one of the best epidemiological studies ever done and it is ongoing, with some additional data from it published only recently (1).
The Massachusetts Male Aging Study looked at classes of depression, with 1 being minimally depressed and 5 being maximally depressed.
The Massachusetts Male Aging Study (MMAS) (Feldman, Goldstein, Hatzichristou, Krane & McKinlay, 1994) found in a large random sample of men 40-70 years of age that ED was present in 52% (17.
The Massachusetts Male Aging Study (MMAS) showed that many medications are directly associated with ED.
13,14] The Massachusetts Male Aging Study (MMAS) demonstrated that low levels of testosterone and SHBG are independent risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes, a significant cardiac risk factor.
According to the Massachusetts Male Aging Study (MMAS), ED affects an estimated 52% of men between the ages of 40 and 70.
The relationship between depressive symptoms and male erectile dysfunction: cross-sectional results from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study.
Utilizing data derived from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study, published in 1994, an estimated 48 million men between the ages of 40 to 70 in the United States, Canada and Europe could suffer from erectile dysfunction.

Full browser ?