famine

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famine

(făm′ĭn)
n.
1. A drastic, wide-reaching food shortage.
2. Severe hunger; starvation.
A catastrophic food shortage due to lack of food or difficulties in food distribution, affecting large numbers of people due to climatic, environmental, socio-economic reasons or extreme political conditions such as tyrannical government or warfare

famine

Pronounced scarcity of food in a broad geographical area, causing widespread starvation, disease, and/or death in a population.
References in periodicals archive ?
A crime occurs when a state has the capacity to predict and plan for a famine-related disaster in order to minimize its impact but fails in disaster preparation and in its ensuing response to mitigate the catastrophic effects, conceals relevant relief information from humanitarian agencies and/or donors, blocks humanitarian corridors, or engages in other faminogenic practices with an aim to exterminate or cause mass starvation of a group of people.
But the United States and other Western governments must do what they can to prevent mass starvation.
However, it is a known fact that since Malthus pronounced his grim warning, mass starvation has become rampant in Asia and Africa.
While there was no mass starvation in Freiburg, unlike in some other German cities, hunger nonetheless played a crucial part in the wartime experience of the residents.
Such an increase should be regarded as a "serious setback" to global efforts to reduce mass starvation, FAO said.
Mocking mass starvation can't be viewed any other way.
In a recent BBC television report, their correspondent Sue Lloyd Roberts, used an image of one severely malnourished child at a "mission hospital in Harare", and with this image she tried to convince the world that this was a definitive sign that Zimbabwe was being stalked by mass starvation.
Parson Malthus predicted mass starvation 250 years ago, as the population was growing geometrically, doubling each generation, while agricultural production was going arithmetically, by 2 percent or so a year.
In 2004, Jocelyn Kaiser wrote in Science, "Soil degradation in all its nefarious forms is not a prelude to mass starvation, as analysts once feared.
Anyone who remembers the 1970s should remember the Club of Rome report that was supposed to be the last word on economic growth grinding to a halt, "overpopulation" and a rapidly approaching era of mass starvation in the 1980s.
Liberals want mass starvation and human devastation.
4-28, with potential for causing mass starvation in many, if not all countries.