Mahoney

(redirected from Mary Eliza)

Mahoney

 [mah-ho´ne]
Mary Eliza (1845–1926). America's first African American professional nurse. One of only four members of her class to complete the rigorous program at the training school of the New England Hospital for Women and Children, she was highly praised for the expert care she gave patients throughout her career. In addition, she was active in many local and national nursing organizations. In 1936, the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses initiated the Mary Mahoney Medal, which is now awarded by the American Nurses' Association for contributions in intergroup relations.

Mahoney, Mary Eliza

(1845-1926), the first African-American nurse. Mahoney did private nursing in the Boston area and was active in furthering intergroup relationships and improving the role of the African-American nurse in the community. A medal in her name, established after her death, was first presented in 1936. It is given to an African-American nurse in recognition of outstanding contribution to the nursing profession.
References in periodicals archive ?
The importance of this ownership goes back to the first nurse of color, Mary Eliza Mahoney (May 7, 1845-January 4, 1926).
Sister Mary Eliza, an Indian citizen, was released on bail on Nov.
Female commentators on interior design and dress, such as Rosmund Marriott Watson and Mary Eliza Haweis, receive a more detailed treatment in due course; Ouida's novels form the basis for a more in-depth study of the origins of the female aesthetic novel; the essays of the poet Alice Meynell are considered for an investigation of how she constructed her turn-of-the-century female aesthetic persona; while the final chapter is an analysis of the novelist Lucas Malet (Mary St Leger Kingsley Harrison), whom Schaffer reclaims from obscurity as a prime leader in the transition `from the genteel Victorian romance novel to the iconoclastic modernist experimental novel' (p.
But the death this summer of 57-year-old Mary Eliza Keewatin, who was also detained by police for public intoxication, has heightened concerns in the community that Kenora Police Service has changed little in the past four years.
My "can do" spirit is inspired by what others have accomplished before me, especially nursing heroines like Mary Eliza Mahoney (1845-1926), the first African American registered nurse in the United States.
April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- During its Annual Leadership Summit on Health Disparities, National Minority Health Month Foundation (NMHMF) will award Kaiser Permanente the 2005 Mary Eliza Mahoney Award, an honor given to individuals or organizations for outstanding contributions to improving access to health care in minority communities.
Rios will be presented with the Mary Eliza Mahoney Award for her outstanding commitment and contributions to improving healthcare for Hispanic communities nationwide.