Marshall


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Mar·shall

(mar'shăl),
Don, 20th-century U.S. ophthalmologist. See: Marshall syndrome.

Mar·shall

(mar'shăl),
Eli K., U.S. pharmacologist, 1889-1966. See: Marshall method.

Mar·shall

(mar'shăl),
John, English anatomist, 1818-1891. See: Marshall vestigial fold, Marshall oblique vein.

Mar·shall

(mar'shăl),
Victor F., 20th-century U.S. urologist. See: Marshall test, Marshall-Marchetti test, Marshall-Marchetti-Krantz operation.
References in periodicals archive ?
We had tremendous support from the city who lobbied the province on our behalf," says Marshall.
Moreover, the focus on Conde, Kincaid, and Marshall makes sense, since they are the most studied women diaspora writers in the United States as well as occupying the "center stage of Caribbean writings.
Rourke (cited in Marshall & Hynd, 1997) furthered this discussion when he found that attention deficit disorder/without hyperactivity displays a type of inattention symptomatic of nonverbal learning disorder, including math disabilities.
To avoid future mishaps of this sort, Marshall developed a personal portfolio and began charging clients up front for half of the job's cost.
There were nineteen casting sessions before Marshall and codirector Sam Mendes (who directed the 1993 Donmar Cabaret) settled on the six Kit Kat girls.
Hobson in The Great Chief Justice: John Marshall and the Rule of Law proceeds to dispel a number of stubborn myths that cloud our understanding of Marshall's tenure as chief justice.
Fully developed people living in harmony with nature have no need for moral guidelines or maps to help them through the maze of life's choices," claims Marshall.
The Fire Marshall saw things he liked, but raised the key issue of the furniture being located in the central cluster areas, which he viewed as the corridor.
The Marshall & Swift National Average Index also found that commercial building costs rose 2.