Marmot Review

Marmot Review

A 2010 report published by Professor Michael Marmot who, at the request of the then-Secretary of State for Health, was tasked with proposing the most effective evidence-based strategies for reducing health inequalities in England. The report, Fair Society Healthy Lives, concluded that reducing health inequalities would require action on six policy objectives:
• Give every child the best start in life;
• Enable all children, young people and adults to maximise their capabilities and have control over their lives;
• Create fair employment and good work for all;
• Ensure healthy standard of living for all;
• Create and develop healthy and sustainable places and communities;
• Strengthen the role and impact of ill-health prevention.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Marmot Review in 2012 noted that if everyone were as healthy as middle class university graduates, with everyone without a degree having their death rate lowered to that of people with degrees, there would be 202,000 fewer early deaths each year among those under 30.
The provider will ensure that the service is delivered in line with the recommendations from The Marmot Review Fair Society Healthy Lives and is aimed at the target populations detailed below: Routine and manual workers, long-term unemployed and never worked groups; Pregnant women and their partners; People living in disadvantaged areas i.
Marmot (2010) Fair society, healthy lives : the Marmot Review .
They discuss the health divide in the UK and how public health measures have tried to address it; the Marmot Review, Fair Society, Healthy Lives and its impact and role in current public health policy and practice; and social determinants of health encountered throughout the lifespan, including with the pre-birth and early years, teenage mothers who are breastfeeding, mothers and babies in prison, children in educational settings, early adulthood, women, and adults in later life, as well as the sexuality and relationships of young people in educational settings, the emotional health and well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals, hepatitis C testing, welfare rights and health benefits, and employment and well-being.
gt; The very influential reports Closing the gap in a generation of the WHO Commission on SDOH chaired by Sir Michael Marmot, the Marmot Review Fair society, healthy lives and The spirit level by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett (all together renowned British academics) were published during the time of the process and presented further evidence, which opened a window of opportunity by giving additional impetus to the debate (41).
The Marmot Review - published in 2010 - re-shaped the approach to improving public health.
In his introduction to the seminal Marmot Review entitled Fair Society Healthy Lives, Sir Michael Marmot said: "People with a higher socioeconomic position in society have a greater array of life chances and more opportunities to lead a flourishing life.
The probe, aimed at giving children the best possible start to life, was prompted by the Government's Marmot Review, which says health differences are "avoidable, unfair and unacceptable".
In his introduction to his seminal Marmot Review, Sir Michael Marmot said: "People with a higher socioeconomic position in society have a greater array of life chances and more opportunities to lead a flourishing life.
4-7) These have parallels in other countries, notably England, in initiatives such as the Whitehall studies (beginning in 1967) and the Marmot Review.
In line with the specific features of sociological inquiry, the results of this research have stimulated a critical appraisal of avoidable health inequalities, and they are now instrumental in supporting policies of societal change in the field of health (WHO 2008, The Marmot Review 2010).