marguerite

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marguerite

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Marguerite de Navarre, the older sister of King Francois I, had considerable influence upon religious matters in sixteenth-century France and often shared letters from her spiritual adviser Guillaume Briconnet, Bishop of Meaux, with her brother.
From that assumption follows another: one may date her plays according to what Marguerite might have felt comfortable in staging publicly at particular times.
Marguerite, we may infer, enjoyed a certain amount of power at this time with regard to reformist writers and churchmen.
Not only does Marguerite champion her "children" with this play, but she also illustrates very dearly the importance of simplicity to faith.
After an Introduction showing the extent to which Helisenne's work has been re-evaluated in the past thirty years, Wood moves on to study the theme of "reading," in her first chapter: both reading by Marguerite Briet herself; in addition to reception of Helisenne's work from the sixteenth century to the present.
Chapter two considers the problem of the relationship between the historical Marguerite Briet and Helisenne the writer.
In any case, the Marguerite who concerns us here, as the firstborn child in a branch of the Orleans line, occupied the center of parental-dynastic attention, but only until Francois came along two years later to displace her: displace her not only as the new baby but as the desired boy, the potential heir to the French throne which under Salic law she could never be.
3) Marguerite sympathized with the evangelical movement in France and by her patronage sheltered many of its members.
The penitential roles Marguerite adopts are, with one exception, familiar in Christian devotional tradition.
Marguerite de Navarre believed that Francois possessed a multi-faceted grace, a word she used often in letters to her brother to symbolize divine assistance and virtuous aspects of his character.
Jean Bouchet, poet, historian, and friend of Marguerite de Navarre, fused both dynastic traditions in a glorification written within two years after the king's death: "Il estoit grande comme venant d'Hector.
In Triumphes de Vertuz, dedicated to Louise de Savoie by her devotee, the monk Jean Thenaud, the king's mother was depicted as divine Lathone, fountain of all the virtues; Francois and Marguerite were Diane and Apollo.