Marek's disease

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Marek's disease

a transmissible disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus that carries some retrovirus oncogenes; characterized by a tumorous, mononuclear infiltration of peripheral nerves, causing limb paralysis. Infiltration of other organs and tissues is common, especially of the iris, causing blindness, and of the ovaries. Vaccination is highly effective and without it serious outbreaks with heavy losses can occur. Called also neural lymphomatosis, neurolymphomatosis gallinarum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: There is a threat that evolutionary responses can render vaccines ineffective, as illustrated by the emergence of the increasingly virulent Marek Disease Virus strains in poultry following vaccination campaigns.
Several viral diseases can present with a marked lymphocytic leukocytosis such as avian leukosis virus, reticuloendotheliosis virus, and Marek disease, (10-14) but they are not generally associated with a strong heterophilic leukocytosis.
Lesions resembling human atheromata developed in pathogen-free chickens infected with Marek disease virus, an avian herpesvirus; immunization with turkey herpesvirus was protective.