Marek's disease


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Marek's disease

a transmissible disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus that carries some retrovirus oncogenes; characterized by a tumorous, mononuclear infiltration of peripheral nerves, causing limb paralysis. Infiltration of other organs and tissues is common, especially of the iris, causing blindness, and of the ovaries. Vaccination is highly effective and without it serious outbreaks with heavy losses can occur. Called also neural lymphomatosis, neurolymphomatosis gallinarum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sometimes the chicks are vaccinated for Marek's disease, but not always.
The miR-147 was induced upon Toll-like receptor stimulation and functioned as a negative regulator of TLR-associated signaling events in murine macrophages and it was up-regulated when chickens were infected with Marek's disease virus [39].
Marek's disease is caused by a highly contagious herpesvirus that primarily affects young adult chickens.
The diagnostic data supports the finding that Marek's disease is the most commonly diagnosed disease throughout California.
No neural involvement was present, while in Marek's disease neural involvement is a conspicuous feature (Halliwell, 1971).
Protection of chickens against very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) and Marek's disease virus (MDV) with a recombinant MDV expressing IBDV VP2.
1,3,10) Some infectious disease agents that can cause severe inflammation within the bird eye are West Nile virus, avian encephalomyelitis virus, Marek's disease virus (gallid herpesvirus 2), Pasteurella multocida, septicemia from salmonellosis or Mycoplasma gallisepticum, toxoplasmosis, and mycotic endophthalmitis from disseminated aspergillosis or candidiasis.
Venugopal K The importance of MHC for Rous sarcoma virus and Marek's disease virus some Payneful considerations.
First- and second-generation Marek's disease vaccines.
Although drugs and vaccines can adequately control some diseases, other diseases, such as infectious bursal disease, Marek's disease and now Salmonella enteritis, simply cannot be adequately controlled by these measures.
Coussens conducted research on the molecular biology of Marek's disease virus, an oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus.
Based on the signalment, clinical signs, and EMG findings, the tentative diagnosis was peripheral neuritis secondary to Marek's disease (gallid herpesvirus 2).