Proust

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Related to Marcel Proust: Ernest Hemingway

Proust

(prūst),
T., 19th-century French physician. See: Proust space.

Proust

(prūst),
Louis J., French chemist, 1755-1826. See: Proust law.
References in periodicals archive ?
En 1909, quand Marcel Proust annonce ceci a Madame Levi-Strauss, l'une de ses grandes amies : << Je viens de commencer, et de finir une ceuvre >>, son projet d'ecriture a ete definitivement trace depuis son point de depart jusqu'a son point d'arrivee.
Madame Proust, remarkably well translated by Alice Kaplan, is an excellent book about the time of Marcel Proust and the milieu of his family but inevitably cannot do justice to the complexity of the relationship between this mother and her son.
Critical Interpretations: Marcel Proust and Remembrance of Things Past,
But maybe Marcel Proust was wrong, and maybe humans can learn from their past behavior.
In Remembrance of Things Past, Marcel Proust acknowledges openly
The intention of this piece was to create a chair that nineteenth-century French novelist Marcel Proust might have sat in.
In the opening chapter of Combray, Marcel Proust describes how the protagonist wakes up in his bed and gradually reconstructs his world on the basis of 'the memory of the sides, knees and shoulders'.
A woman of many accomplishments, she was a recognized Marcel Proust scholar, having studied at the Sorbonne and having received her doctorate from the University of Chicago.
Traditionally associated with "promiscuity, slothfulness and lazy people," McKay says there are a lot of high-achieving people who worked out of their beds, including Marcel Proust, Mark Twain, John Milton, Sibelius, Elizabeth Barrett Browning and a woman in Beverly Hills who is owner of the patent for the push-up bra.
In his book Remembrance of Things Past, Marcel Proust tells his readers that often the past is hidden "beyond the reach of intellect, in some material object (in the sensation which that material object will give us) which we do not suspect.
In his monumental book Remembrance of Things Past, Marcel Proust tells his readers that often the past is hidden "beyond the reach of intellect, in some material object (in the sensation that material object will give us) which we do not suspect.
Marcel Proust utilizes an appropriate metaphor in pointing out "that the real act of discovery consists not in finding new lands but in seeing with new eyes" (Barker, 1992).