vacuum aspiration

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aspiration

 [as″pĭ-ra´shun]
inhalation of some foreign material; aspiration of vomitus, blood, or mucus may occur when a person is unconscious or under the effects of a general anesthetic, and can be avoided by keeping the head turned to the side and removing all such foreign material from the air passages.
A, Types of aspiration. A, Aspiration before swallow caused by reduced tongue control. B, Aspiration before swallow caused by absent swallow response. C, Aspiration during swallow caused by reduced laryngeal closure. D Aspiration after swallow caused by pooled material in pyriform sinuses overflowing into airway. From Logemann J: Evaluation and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders, San Diego, College-Hill Press, 1983.
withdrawal of fluid by an aspirator; the method is widely used in hospitals, especially during surgery, to drain the area of the body being operated on and keep it clear of excess blood and other fluids to facilitate visualization of the surgical field. Sometimes after extensive surgery, suction drainage under the skin is used to speed the healing process.
meconium aspiration inhalation of meconium by the fetus or newborn, which may result in atelectasis, emphysema, pneumothorax, or pneumonia.
risk for aspiration a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual is at risk for entry of gastric secretions, oropharyngeal secretions, solids, or fluids into the tracheobronchial passage.
vacuum aspiration a form of induced abortion in which the uterine contents are removed by application of a vacuum through a hollow curet or a cannula introduced into the uterus.

vacuum aspiration

n.
A method of abortion performed during the first trimester of pregnancy in which the contents of the uterus are withdrawn through a narrow tube. Also called suction curettage, vacuum curettage.

vacuum aspiration

[vak′yo̅o̅·əm]
Etymology: L, vacuus, empty, aspirare, to breathe upon
a method of removing tissues from the uterus by suction for diagnostic purposes or to remove elements of conception. With the patient under local or light general anesthesia, the cervix is dilated, and the uterus is emptied with suction. Postoperative care includes the close observation of vital signs for symptoms of blood loss. Also called suction curettage. Compare dilation and curettage. See also elective abortion, therapeutic abortion.

vacuum aspiration

Evacuation of the contents of the uterus by a curet or catheter attached to a suction apparatus. The procedure is performed before the 12th week of gestation. It is the most common form of surgical abortion. Synonym: suction aspiration
See also: aspiration
References in periodicals archive ?
Manual vacuum aspiration and medical termination of pregnancy with Misoprostol have been introduced to replace this method.
Replacement of dilatation and curettage/evacuation by Manual vacuum aspiration and medical abortion, and the introduction of post abortion contraception in Pakistan.
A comparative study between manual vacuum aspiration and electrical vacuum aspiration for the first trimester medical termination of pregnancy.
These studies have proved that management of incomplete abortion with manual vacuum aspiration is cost effective with short hospital stay.
Manual vacuum aspiration in the emergency department for management of early pregnancy failure.
The treatment was considered a failure if the woman was still bleeding or cramping and the uterus was not empty; at this time, manual vacuum aspiration was performed unless the woman was stable and opted for a second 800 mcg dose of misoprostol.
Keywords: abortion complications, post-abortion care, delay in care, training of service providers, manual vacuum aspiration, Gabon
In sub-Saharan Africa manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) is the standard management of an incomplete miscarriage, and recent trials have compared oral misoprostol (600 micrograms) with MVA to measure outcomes and side-effects.
Simultaneously, manual vacuum aspiration, * a technology that permits very early abortion in a medical office setting, also reemerged.
The letter also criticized the Ministry for sowing doubts regarding the use of manual vacuum aspiration, a safe technique for the treatment of induced abortions.
Manual vacuum aspiration has been proved to be safe both in clinics in third world countries, where its use has largely been pioneered as a way to increase the availability of abortion, and in private offices, he said.