plume

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plume

The concentration profile of an airborne or waterborne release of materials as it spreads from its source; an area of chemicals in a particular medium (e.g., air or groundwater), moving away from its source in a band or column, as of smoke from a chimney or chemicals moving with groundwater.

plume

(ploom)
A wisp or puff of smoke, esp. one that may rise from a surgical field in which electrocautery or lasers are used to cut, coagulate, or destroy tissue. Surgical plumes may contain carbon monoxide, among other potentially toxic gases.
References in periodicals archive ?
It appears that the mantle plume under the western U.
The latter may have originated as dispersed parts of ancient mantle plumes similar to a modern plume responsible for the formation of the intraplate Bowie Seamount.
The ascent of said deep mantle plume generated a true chemical factory that enriched the mantle with metals, which would later generate the conditions for the creation of gold deposits.
Our findings suggest that mantle plume processes seem to exert a first-order control on the modern JFR architecture but plate tectonic processes have also played a secondary role.
ne Seroussi and Erik Ivins of NASA's Jet Propulsion Labora (JPL) in Pasadena, California, studied this mantle plume idea through numerical modeling, since getting direct measurements from under the ice is difficult.
We think that mantle plumes are 'tapping' a deep, hot region of the mantle that hasn't cooled very much since the Archean," Gazel said.
The density difference between a rising mantle plume and the cooler material that surrounds it enables scientists to distinguish the two.
One school argues that oceanic islands develop above mantle plume convection cells that deliver recycled components and FOZO (lower mantle?
The surfacing of a mantle plume leads to physical and chemical changes of the local, regional, and global environment, which in turn affect the conditions and evolution of life on Earth.
1999, Tomographic evidence for a narrow whole mantle plume below Iceland: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v.
Fernandina is the youngest -- at around 700,000 years old -- and sits on a weakness in the Earth's crust known as a hot spot or a mantle plume.