plume

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plume

The concentration profile of an airborne or waterborne release of materials as it spreads from its source; an area of chemicals in a particular medium (e.g., air or groundwater), moving away from its source in a band or column, as of smoke from a chimney or chemicals moving with groundwater.

plume

(ploom)
A wisp or puff of smoke, esp. one that may rise from a surgical field in which electrocautery or lasers are used to cut, coagulate, or destroy tissue. Surgical plumes may contain carbon monoxide, among other potentially toxic gases.
References in periodicals archive ?
The latter may have originated as dispersed parts of ancient mantle plumes similar to a modern plume responsible for the formation of the intraplate Bowie Seamount.
HARD EVIDENCE In the 1960s, scientists first conceived of mantle plumes as long cylinders of buoyant rock that gradually flatten and spread into mushroom shapes as the molten masses rise through the mantle.
Mantle plumes do not exist and hot-spot trails are seen as the result of propagating cracks in the lithosphere.
1998, Detection of mantle plumes in the lower mantle by diffraction tomography: Hawaii: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v.
2002, Extraterrestrial influences on mantle plume activity: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v.
88 Ga dyke, the NW-trending Pickle Crow dyke [#8c] crossing the interior of western Superior Province provides a link between the Animikie Basin and Thompson Belt magmatic activity, and may suggest a mantle plume model for the western part of the 1.
According to their theory, the breakup of continents is directly linked with mantle plumes.
Most important, perhaps, has been the overall shift in thinking away from general geology and economics and towards tectonics, with much of the volcanic activity east of the Cascade Mountains now being attributed to hot spots or mantle plumes.
Venus hosts at least nine volcanic hot spots, or mantle plumes, similar to the plumes thought to power the Hawaiian island chain, Smrekar and colleagues suggested in Science last year.
Other topics of the 21 papers include the formation of Martian river valleys by impacts, oceanic island basalts and mantle plumes, frictional melting processes in planetary materials, spatial patterns in isotopic biogeochemistry, and glacial earthquakes in Greenland and Antarctica.
Hart is a geologist and isotope geochemist whose recent research has focused on the origin of hot spots and mantle plumes and on the dynamics and evolution of the deep Earth.
In their analysis of recent scientific findings, Rampino and Prokoph observe that mantle plumes coincide with cyclical surface changes, suggesting that the plumes themselves may be cyclical in nature.