mammal

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mammal

 [mam´al]
an individual of the Mammalia, a division of vertebrates, including all that possess hair and suckle their young. adj., adj mammal´ian.

mam·mal

(mam'ăl),
An animal of the class Mammalia.

mammal

/mam·mal/ (mam´'l) an individual of the class Mammalia.mamma´lian

mammal

(măm′əl)
n.
Any of various warm-blooded vertebrate animals of the class Mammalia, including humans, characterized by a covering of hair on the skin and, in the female, milk-producing mammary glands for nourishing the young.

mam·ma′li·an (mă-mā′lē-ən) adj. & n.

mammal

any animal of the class Mammalia, a group of about 4250 species, often regarded as the most highly evolved animals, and so named because they all possess MAMMARY GLANDS. There are three living subclasses:
  1. Monotremata - MONOTREMES, primitive egg-laying mammals such as the duck-billed platypus and Echidna, the spiny ant eater.
  2. Marsupialia - MARSUPIALS, which transfer their young to pouches for the latter part of their early development.
  3. Eutheria - EUTHERIANS, which have a placenta.

Mammals are characterized by the presence of hair, a DIAPHRAGM used in AERIAL RESPIRATION, milk secretion in the female (LACTATION) for suckling the young, presence of only the left systemic arch in the blood circulatory system, three auditory ossicles in the ear, and a lower jaw of a single pair of bones. In all classes except the monotremes, the young are born live (see VIVIPAROUS).

mammal

an individual of the class Mammalia, a division of vertebrates, including all that possess hair and suckle their young.

eutherian m's
true placental mammals which develop chorion, amnion, yolk sac and allantois, all of which contribute to the placenta. Called also placental mammals.
metatherian m's
marsupials including kangaroos, opossums which are born after a brief period of development and spend a long time being nurtured by the mother, usually in a pouch or marsupium.
placental mammal
see eutherian mammals (above).
prototherian m's
monotremes, the egg-laying mammals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jefferson Soriano, BFAR veterinarian and focal person of the Philippine Marine Mammal Stranding Network (PMMSN), said there is no visible evidence that the mammal was wounded.
The 33-page study analyzed data from 2,415 different species of mammals that are alive today.
While overhunting of small mammals, such as bats, can lead to the loss of many species vital for dispersal of seeds and pollination of flowers, the loss of larger species could lead to irreversible ecological changes, as this group of mammals is disproportionately threatened by overhunting.
Whereas losses of mammals elsewhere in the world are due mostly to habitat loss and hunting, the main factors that have driven mammal decline in Australia have been introduced predators (the Red Fox Vulpes vulpes and feral Cat Felis catus) and changed fire regimes (Woinarski et al.
The images will be uploaded on to a dedicated Mammal Web internet portal for analysis by scientists at Durham University.
We consistently find with every new fossil that the earliest mammals were just as diverse in both feeding and locomotor adaptations as modern mammals," says Zhe-Xi Luo, professor of organismal biology and anatomy at the University of Chicago.
Non-volant small mammals, an integral part of the forest ecosystem, are critical to the species diversity and functional diversity of the ecosystem (Carey and Johnson, 1995; Zhang et al.
The ability of mammals to hibernate, burrow and nest was not a good predictor of whether a species responded to climate change or not.
They are also the most diverse mammal group and includes rodents, whales and humans.
Some animals that are not mammals have belly buttons.
But the new work shows that warm-blooded mammals have banded bones, too.
Jenny MacPherson, project officer for the Vincent Wildlife Trust, said the aim is to collect information on the status of these mammals and their habitat needs, using DNA techniques to identify species and individuals from samples such as hair and faeces.