Malthusian catastrophe

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Malthusian catastrophe

A hypothetical limit on human population espoused by English theologian and scholar Thomas Robert Malthus in his 1798 Essay on the Principle of Population. Malthus believed that humans would eventually reproduce in such excess that they would surpass the limits of food supplies; once they reached this point, some sort of "catastrophe” was inevitable to control the population and human resources.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Future of Sex," however, did contain one contentious claim that "we have broken out of the Malthusian trap.
Conversely, he uses China's spectacular transformation from an impoverished agrarian society to a formidable industrial superpower to shed light on the fundamental shortcomings of the institutional theory and mainstream "blackboard" economic models and to reevaluate historical episodes such as Africa's enduring poverty, Latin America's lost decades and debt crises, 19th-century Europe's escape from the Malthusian trap, and the Industrial Revolution itself.
Much of his thesis hangs on slavery's instrumental role in breaking the Malthusian trap or cycle that typified preindustrial economies.
For a while, from the middle of the nineteenth century, it looked as if the Malthusian trap was no longer operative.
The modern Malthusian must also tackle the two big objections that have been made to Malthus's theory for nigh on a century now, namely that improvements in the technology of food production on the one hand, and of contraception on the other, have defanged both jaws of the Malthusian trap.
A whole chapter is also devoted to what Kenny describes as the end of the Malthusian trap.
The green revolution and technological progress have contributed to decisively overcome the Malthusian trap and to bring about an impressive demographic explosion.
The April 2010 issue of Foreign Policy ominously warned that failing to meet the challenge of "peak phosphorus" would mean that "humanity faces a Malthusian trap of widespread famine on a scale that we have not yet experienced.
It is divided into three parts: the Malthusian Trap which presents a global model of traditional society that runs from the birth of civilization to 1800, the coming of the Industrial Revolution, and finally what Clark refers to as the Great Divergence or the failure of industrialization in most of the under-developed countries.
The Savage Wars of Peace: England, Japan and the Malthusian Trap, by Alan Macfarlane.
The pessimists obviously conjure up the terrifying prospect of a Malthusian trap and famine to frighten their readers into embracing coercive population-control measures such as forced sterilization, which would have appalled Malthus, an ordained clergyman and a humane man.
is how to find effective global solutions in order to free the poorer three-quarters of humankind from the growing Malthusian trap of malnutrition, starvation, resource depletion, unrest, enforced migration, and armed conflict - developments that will also endanger the richer nations, if less directly.