malpractice premium

malpractice premium

The annual fee paid by a medically qualified doctor or other licensee to a malpractice insurance carrier to cover the liability of medical practice.
In the US, the lowest premiums (roughly $4000/year) are in rehabilitation medicine in the southeastern states; the highest are in obstetrics, orthopaedics, and neurosurgery in New York, California, Florida and Massachusetts ($175K).
References in periodicals archive ?
Damage caps are not the reason for stability in the medical malpractice premium markets.
Resident survey data are supplemented with malpractice premium data from the Medical Liability Monitor (MLM).
t tests were used to compare physician responses with actual malpractice premium values.
In the first instance, obviously physician practices pay the malpractice premium, but they may be able to shift some or all of high or growing premiums onto insurers and patients.
Third, to the extent that the growth of malpractice premium costs is passed on to patients through higher health insurance premiums, increases in malpractice liability could affect health insurance coverage and employment.
In summary, multiple factors have contributed to the recent increases in medical malpractice premium rates in the states we analyzed.
Given the nature of the institutions, a small set of information describing a practice's structure, history, and location is sufficient to separate the malpractice premium into the common base fee and the individual-specific component.
Physicians and casual observers often conclude that there is a medical malpractice premium crisis because they rely on unreliable data or misinterpret accurate data.
Kessler and McClellan (1997) used 1985-1993 physician self-reported malpractice premium data to examine the effects of "direct" and "indirect" malpractice reforms on the rates of increases in premiums.
GAO) investigated rising malpractice premium rates and possible causes
If somebody pays a high malpractice premium but is still making $300,000 a year, what's important is the net income.
States have revised tort laws under which malpractice lawsuits are litigated to help constrain malpractice premium and claims costs.