malformation

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Related to Malformations: Congenital malformations

deformity

 [de-for´mĭ-te]
distortion of any part or of the body in general; called also malformation.
Arnold-Chiari deformity a congenital anomaly in which the cerebellum and medulla oblongata protrude down into the cervical spinal canal through the foramen magnum; it is almost always associated with meningomyelocele and hydrocephalus.
Madelung's deformity radial deviation of the hand secondary to overgrowth of the distal ulna or shortening of the radius.

mal·for·ma·tion

(mal'fōr-mā'shŭn),
Failure of proper or normal development; more specifically, a primary structural defect that results from a localized error of morphogenesis; for example, cleft lip. Most malformations are considered to be a defect of a morphogenetic or developmental field that responds as a coordinated unit to embryonic interaction. Compare: deformation.

malformation

/mal·for·ma·tion/ (-for-ma´shun)
1. a type of anomaly.
2. a morphologic defect of an organ or larger region of the body, resulting from an intrinsically abnormal developmental process.

malformation

(măl′fôr-mā′shən)
n.
1. The condition of being malformed; deformity.
2. A body part that is malformed; a deformity.

malformation

[mal′fôrmā′shən]
Etymology: L, malus, bad, forma, shape
an anomalous structure in the body. See also congenital anomaly.

malformation

An isolated birth defect caused by abnormal growth of an organ, which, if surgical correction is possible, usually has a good prognosis.

malformation

Neonatology An isolated birth defect caused by abnormal growth of an organ, which, if surgical correction is possible, usually has a good prognosis. See Arnold-Chiari malformation, Arteriovenous malformation, Birth defect, Cerebral cavernous malformation, Cleft palate, Cystic adenomatoid malformation, Dandy-Walker malformation, Dysmorphology, Spina bifida, Teratogenesis.

mal·for·ma·tion

(mal'fōr-mā'shŭn)
Failure of normal development; more specifically, a primary structural defect that results from a localized error of morphogenesis; e.g., cleft lip.
Compare: deformation

malformation

Any bodily deformity or structural abnormality resulting from a defect in development or growth.

malformation

failure of normal development

mal·for·ma·tion

(mal'fōr-mā'shŭn)
Failure of normal development; more specifically, a primary structural defect that results from a localized error of morphogenesis; e.g., cleft lip.

malformation

defective or abnormal formation; deformity; an anatomical aberration, especially one acquired during development.

Patient discussion about malformation

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

More discussions about malformation
References in periodicals archive ?
Embolotherapy in the treatment of congenital arteriovenous malformations of the hand: a case report.
The degree of right to left shunt suggested a possible 'steal phenomenon' owing to an arteriovenous malformation (AVM).
Van Regemorter N Congenital Malformations in 10000 Consecutive Births in a University Hospital: Needs for Genetic Counselling and Prenatal Diagnosis.
Natural history of cavernous malformations of the brain.
When compared with the group of healthy women who did not have IBD, the risk of congenital malformations was increased by about 45% among women with IBD who were treated with azathioprine or 6-MP.
Vascular malformation masquerading as sialolithiasis and parotid obstruction: A case report and review of the literature.
Cavernous malformation can recur if not excised completely.
The authors examined a total of 172 research papers published over the last 50 years, which looked at a combined total of 174,000 cases of malformation alongside 11.
A proposed grading system for intracranial arteriovenous malformations.
For the same pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, the stroke risk would approximately double with serum iron 6 [micro]mol/L compared to mid-normal range (7-27 [micro]mol/L).
Abstract: Chiari malformations are cerebellar anomalies.
Image in clinical medicine: Neonatal vein of Galen malformation.