gamete

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Related to Male germ cell: Primordial germ cells, germ line cells

gamete

 [gam´ēt]
1. one of two haploid reproductive cells, male (spermatozoon) and female (oocyte), whose union is necessary in sexual reproduction to initiate the development of a new individual.
2. the malarial parasite in its sexual form in a mosquito's stomach, either male (microgamete) or female (macrogamete); the latter is fertilized by the former to develop into an ookinete. adj., adj gamet´ic.

gam·ete

(gam'ēt),
1. One of two haploid cells that can undergo karyogamy.
2. Any germ cell, whether oocyte or sperm.
[G. gametēs, husband; gametē, wife]

gamete

/gam·ete/ (gam´ēt)
1. one of two haploid reproductive cells, male (spermatozoon) and female (oocyte), whose union is necessary in sexual reproduction to initiate the development of a new individual.
2. the malarial parasite in its sexual form in a mosquito's stomach, either male (microgamete) or female (macrogamete); the latter is fertilized by the former to develop into an ookinete.gamet´ic

gamete

(găm′ēt′, gə-mēt′)
n.
A reproductive cell having the haploid number of chromosomes, especially a mature sperm or egg capable of fusing with a gamete of the opposite sex to produce a zygote.

ga·met′ic (-mĕt′ĭk) adj.
ga·met′i·cal·ly adv.

gamete

[gam′ēt]
Etymology: Gk, marriage partner
1 a mature male or female germ cell that is capable of functioning in fertilization or conjugation and contains the haploid number of chromosomes of the organism.
2 an ovum or a spermatozoon. See also meiosis. gametic, adj.

gamete

Genetics A mature ♀ or ♂ reproductive cell–sperm or ovum/egg with a haploid set of chromosomes–23 for humans. See Chromosome, Haploid, Macrogamete, Microgamete, Nullisomic gamete.

gam·ete

(gam'ēt)
1. One of two haploid cells undergoing karyogamy.
2. Any germ cell, whether oocyte or sperm.
[G. gametēs, husband; gametē, wife]

gamete

A cell, such as a sperm or ovum, possessing half the normal number of chromosomes (haploid) and capable of fusing with another gamete in the process of fertilization, so that the full (diploid) number of chromosomes is made up. From the Greek gamos , marriage.

gamete

or

germ cell

a specialized HAPLOID cell that fuses with a gamete from the opposite sex (or mating type) to form a diploid ZYGOTE. In simple organisms, the process is called isogamy (see ISOGAMETE), and OOGAMY in more complex organisms. In animals where oogamy occurs male gametes are called sperm, the female gametes eggs. The situation in higher plants is more complicated, but essentially the male gamete is the generative nucleus found in the POLLEN GRAIN while the female gamete is the egg cell found within the EMBRYO SAC.

Gamete

An egg (ovum) from the female or a mature sperm from the male.
Mentioned in: Infertility Therapies

gamete

a haploid germ cell; one of two cells, male (spermatozoon) and female (ovum), whose union is necessary in sexual reproduction to initiate the development of a new individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
The primary spermatogonia are the largest male germ cells and exhibit several conspicuous perinuclear ("nuage") bodies.
Estrogen receptor beta-mediated inhibition of male germ cell line development in mice by endogenous estrogens during perinatal life.
Factor VIII gene inversions causing severe haemophilia A originate almost exclusively in male germ cells.
E) Compromising the future spermatozoa (Sperm motility, abnormal morphology of male germ cells, asthenozoospermia).
The imbalance between prooxidative and antioxidative substances in semen leads to metabolic and functional disorders of the male germ cells and may be a primary cause of some types of infertility.
Topics addressed include germline stem cells, molecular regulation of the mitosis/meiosis decision in multicellular organisms, sex chromosome function in mammalian fertility, transcription regulation in male germ cells, translation control in oocyte development, RNA granules in germ cells, germ cell intercellular bridges, small noncoding RNAs in the germline, mammalian genomic imprinting, and nuclear transfer to eggs and oocytes.
Also [26] did not find dominant lethal mutation in the male germ cells in mice when they were exposed to power frequency magnetic fields at 10 mT for the approximate period of spermatogenesis.
These are male germ cells as well as adult stem cells.