gaze

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Related to Male gaze: female gaze

gaze

 [gāz]
1. to look in one direction for a period of time.
2. the act or state of looking steadily in one direction.

gaze

(gāz),
The act of looking steadily at an object.

gaze

(gāz)
1. to look steadily in one direction.
2. the act of looking steadily at something.

conjugate gaze  the normal movement of the two eyes simultaneously in the same direction to bring something into view.

gaze

[gāz]
Etymology: ME, gazen, to stare
a state of looking in one direction. A person with normal vision has six basic positions of gaze, each determined by control of different combinations of contractions of extraocular muscles. See also cardinal position of gaze.

gaze

To fixate steadily or continuously. See cardinal positions of gaze.
References in periodicals archive ?
These are inherently patriarchal constructs that reinforce the male gaze through female sexual performance.
Nectarfest feat ALGIERS, LIFELESS, ARCS & TRAUMA, PURE GRAFT, JIMMY FLOYD HASSELBAIND, PELLETHEAD, MALE GAZE, BISONS Westgarth Social Club, Middlesbrough Monday, Entry pounds 5 WILLIAM K.
Just as there is a male gaze, there must be a female gaze, but it is an inherent quality and not a deliberate attempt," remarked Nandita Das, the renowned actress, film director and chairperson, Children's Film Society of India.
As such, the viewer of Belle Epoque is guided toward identifying with the male gaze, even when, as in the scene I consider, the subject of desire is a lesbian.
In Do You Like Me Double Box, as in Do You Like Me, Double Eared Box the male gaze is distinct.
We were shown to a table away from the male gaze, but no one around us really cared.
Whilst the 'classic' female body, whose boundaries have been sanitised by the male gaze, has a closed, impenetrable surface, the body of the female adolescent is penetrable, growing, developing breasts and hips, and beginning to menstruate.
Also important to the text is film theory, including theories of the male gaze famously developed by Laura Mulvey, and theories of subjectivity and performativity as found in the work of Judith Butler, Donna Haraway, and N.
In the second part of the chapter, Faulkner discusses the film and television adaptations--(Gonzalo Suarez 1974, Mendez Leite 1995)--of Clarin's La Regenta by focusing on feminist readings on patriarchal power, gender relations and the male gaze.
Is it because the male gaze is so powerful that she needs something to protect her from it?
PF: Two endeavors seem foremost to me in your work: the first is concerned with exploring the male gaze as a framing device (namely, looking as a paradigm of doubling or duplicity), the second with the ambivalent sexuality of said gaze.
The male gaze and its poetic manifestations invariably tend, beyond the specific poetic agenda of the moment, to objectify and dismember female beauty.