Malassezia pachydermatis

Malassezia pachydermatis

a fungus occasionally isolated from skin lesions of humans and animals; a rare cause of fungemia in patients receiving intravenous lipids.

Malassezia pachydermatis

A facultatively lipophilic yeast associated with external otitis externa in dogs. Malassezia pachydermatis may cause sepsis in low-birth-weight infants who receive lipid emulsions.

Malassezia pachydermatis

A species that has been transferred from the pet dogs of health care workers to the infants in a neonatal unit.
See also: Malassezia
References in periodicals archive ?
Malassezia pachydermatis is a yeast that is commonly found in the ear canal, between the toes, anal sacs, vagina, and rectum of healthy dogs.
Dermatitis associated with Malassezia pachydermatis in 11 dogs.
Nosocomial Malassezia pachydermatis bloodstream infections in a neonatal intensive care unit.
2) Human infections by Malassezia species other than M furfur have been reported, such as, for example Malassezia pachydermatis.
2) Unlike M furfur, Malassezia pachydermatis and certain other Malassezia species are not lipid dependent and will grow in the absence of long-chain fatty acid supplementation.
El aislamiento de Malassezia pachydermatis en animales con otitis, 70,52% cultivos positivos, y sin otitis, 28,42% fue significativo (p < 0,05).
The antimycotic effect of TTO in veterinary medicine has successfully been demonstrated against many strains of Malassezia pachydermatis from seborrhoeic dermatitis (Weseler et al.
Polymerase chain reaction assays specific for Malassezia sp, saprophytic fungi, and Candida albicans were performed on DNA prepared from cultured colonies; nested PCR evaluation for Malassezia pachydermatis was then performed.
Speaking of lower life forms, it seems that yeast of the genus Malassezia pachydermatis infest the skin of dog owners as well as their loyal canine companions.
Although rare, cases of life-threatening fungemia in people have been attributed to Malassezia pachydermatis, for which dogs are a natural host.