maitake

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maitake

(mī-tä′kē, -kĕ)
n.
An edible polypore mushroom (Grifola frondosa) native to Japan and North America that produces large clusters of overlapping gray or brown fan-shaped caps, grows at the base of trees or in cultivation, and is prized in Japanese cuisine and used as a dietary supplement. Also called hen of the woods.

maitake

an herbal product derived from a mushroom that is native to Japan.
uses It is used as an immunostimulant and as a treatment for diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, and obesity. It is probably safe, but there is no reliable information related to efficacy.
contraindications It is not recommended during pregnancy and lactation, in children, or in those with known hypersensitivity until more information is available.

maitake

Herbal medicine
A mushroom (Grifola frondoa) that lowers blood pressure and enhances the immune system by increasing natural killer cell activity, increasing release of interleukin-1 and stimulating cytotoxic T cells; it inhibits growth of experimental tumours.

maitake (mī·täˑ·kē),

n Latin name:
Grifola frondosa; part used: fruiting body (mushroom); uses: adaptogen, chemopreventive effects, immuno-modulator, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, cholesterol, obesity, cancer, AIDS; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children. Also called
dancing mushroom, king of mushrooms, monkey's bench, or
shelf fungi.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is an expanded version of a lecture presented at the International Society of Integrative Medicine meeting in Tokyo Japan on July 19, 2009, The lecture was partially supported by Maitake Mushrooms Inc.
boulardii, the prebiotics inulin and fructooligosaccharide (FOS), whey protein isolates, which help form glutathione in the body, and a variety of high beta-glucan derivatives from shiitake, reishi and maitake mushrooms," said The Wright Group's Mr.
of Brattleboro, Vermont, which holds the North American marketing and distribution rights to the Maitake Beta-[1,6]- and [1,3]-Glucans extract found in maitake mushrooms and protected by U.
The maitake extract tablets contained 18 mg of an extract called "SX-fraction" (MSX), a water-soluble glycoprotein, and 250 mg of dried maitake mushroom powder.
Each tablet of this product is standardized to have at least 18 mg of the insulin-reducing extract and 250 mg of dried maitake mushroom powder.
Most recently MPI collaborated with Georgetown University and New York Medical College to carry out further investigations of its Maitake mushroom products.
He is author of several books, including Seafood Sense: The Truth About Seafood Nutrition and Safety (Basic Health 2005) and Maitake Mushroom and D-Fraction (Woodland 2003).
Yukiguni Maitake Company Ltd, of Japan, a cultivator of the maitake mushroom, has been awarded a patent for the drying process of the fresh maitake mushroom, which produces a stable dried "Active Oxygen Scavenging Agent.
Georgetown University researchers have also studied the use of nutraceuticals, such as niacin-bound chromium and SX-Fraction, derived from Maitake mushroom (Grifola frondosa), as ways to improve insulin resistance and lower high blood pressure.
In terms of the maitake mushroom, Growing Gourmet and Medicinal Mushrooms by Paul Stamets stated, "In vitro studies at the National Cancer Institute of the powdered fruit bodies of Grifola frondosa showed significant activity against the HIV (AIDS) virus when tested through its Anti-HIV Drug Testing System under the Developmental Therapeutics Program.
after many years of research and development with the active glycoprotein of the Maitake mushroom, has officially been granted a US Patent.
It all started with the introduction of the maitake mushroom to the West, which led to the development of the powerful immune-supporting, one and only Maitake D-Fraction.