macroeconomics

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macroeconomics

study of an economy as a whole; includes the total or aggregate level of output of an economy and prices for the economy, viewed as a whole. See also microeconomics.
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Though Keynes' macro-economics was largely concerned with the conditions of prudent growth, he also foresaw a time when the 'economic problem' would be solved and 'we prefer to devote our further energies to non-economic purposes' (Keynes, 1930).
The application of standard micro- and macro-economic research tools to real business data almost always opens eyes and sharpens the understanding of clients.
This paper examines the impact on student performance and satisfaction of an integrated micro- and macro-economics principles course, taught with a strong emphasis on classroom experiments and active learning.
In first year micro and macro-economics, it makes more sense to provide students with a good understanding of basic mainstream concepts and analysis.
However Malaysia's domestic lending policies were dubious and a bad regional macro-economic policy became a national disaster.
He illustrates the damage done by the formalist mindset with a series of examples from new classical macro-economics.
Mainstream micro- and macro-economics, human capital and cultural theory, and various streams of Marxist thought all are found wanting.
The company also evaluates and assesses the impact of macro-level drivers including geopolitics, macro-economics and energy policies.
The Unit monitors and analyses the system risk and supervises the framework which includes a number of precautionary indicators and macro-economics.
Juan Jensen, head of macro-economics at Brazilian consulting firm Tendencias, attributed the slowdown in Brazil's $2.
He specialises in macro-economics in the Russian Federation and the United States, metals, oil, currency and stock markets.
Goldman in particular continues to emphasise that politics is currently a much bigger driver of market action than either micro- or macro-economics, and that, lacking any 'edge' as to what politicians might say at any given time, the firm generally feels that it needs to stay pretty close to home, from a risk perspective.