macro

(redirected from Macri)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

macro

(mak′rō)
A set of instructions that invokes the computer to run a command or an action, e.g., pressing “Ctrl” + “i” to add italics to selected text.

macro,

pref a prefix meaning excessively large or big.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysts say the Macri win could position him well for a 2011 presidential run, but Macri focused on crime, traffic, crumbling schools, budget overruns, and garbage collection in appeals to the 2.
Another figure preparing for 2007 is Elisa Carrio of the left-wing ARI, but she is in weak condition after Macri beat her soundly in mid-term elections last October.
Macri began his 4-year term in a ceremony snubbed by his predecessor, Cristina Fernandez, following a spat over where the handover of power should take place.
The election of Macri promises better diplomatic days ahead: He plans to shift Argentina's foreign relations away from China, Iran, Russia and Venezuela toward the US and Europe.
Macri will take office December 10, replacing Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, who had signed the agreement with Iran and long defended it against much criticism in Argentina, where it was widely ridiculed as giving the accused the right to run the police investigation into the accused's conduct.
Macri has signalled he intends to chart a new course by expanding trade with the US and Europe.
Macri has previously demured on giving details on his strategy to lift outgoing president Cristina Fernandez' so-called "clamp-down" on dollar purchases that has created a multi-tiered exchange rate, saying he must first take a close look at the true state of national accounts.
Macri is best described as a "liberal" -- in the European sense of the word.
Secretary of State Peter Stenlund will attend the inauguration of the newly-elected President of Argentine, centre-right Mauricio Macri, in Buenos Aires on 10 December 2015.
As mayor of the capital, Macri fired 2,400 municipal workers, arguing they were phantom employees who collected salaries but never showed up to work.
Aside from a short response by King (2002) to Dalziel, Cullen and Saunders' (2002) critique, (7) the only other New Zealand-focussed studies found were written by Macri and Sinha, and in one instance, with McAleer (8).
He then resigned and was snapped up by Boca president Mauricio Macri.