MRSA screening

MRSA screening

The testing of all members of a particular group of individuals for (benign) cutaneous or nasopharyngeal colonisation by meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, to identify those at increased risk of healthcare associated infections, especially MRSA-bacteraemia following an intervention. The current standard in the UK is that all patients in certain groups (see table) undergoing elective procedures should be screened for MRSA. 

Patients needing MRSA screening 
• Burns patients
• Cardiothoracic
• High dependency unit
• Intensive care
• Neonatal
• Neurosurgery
• Oncology
• Orthopaedics patients
References in periodicals archive ?
Some tests may also be carried out such as blood and MRSA screening.
2014 North American MRSA Screening Technology Innovation Leadership Award
The purpose of the MRSA screening program is to protect patients without previous colonization from acquiring an MRSA infection while in the hospital (HA-MRSA-I).
Current guidelines in the Netherlands recommend MRSA screening for all patients with professional exposure to livestock, and many hospitals treat such patients in isolation while screening results are pending (i.
In addition, several states have passed or are considering legislation mandating the implementation of MRSA screening programs to reduce the risk to patients.
An MRSA screening program is now in place, and patients, visitors and staff are provided with antiseptic gel dispensers throughout the hospitals to keep their hands clean so that the risk of spreading the virus is reduced.
A spokesman for the George Eliot NHS Trust said: "The past year included several infection milestones, including us becoming one of the first in the country, along with other local hospitals, to introduce MRSA screening for emergency patients.
Several studies have been conducted in other surgical fields evaluating the efficacy of MRSA screening, treatment protocols, and costs.
Discuss the importance of institutions implementing a MRSA screening and surveillance program.
APIC and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America in 2007 issued a joint statement opposing MRSA screening mandates, saying they are too costly and limit the flexibility of hospital infection-control efforts.