MRA


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medical

 [med´ĭ-kal]
pertaining to medicine or to the treatment of diseases; pertaining to medicine as opposed to surgery.
medical assistant a person who, under the direction of a qualified physician, performs a variety of routine administrative and clinical tasks in a physician's office, a hospital, or some other clinical facility.
medical laboratory technician (MLT) see clinical laboratory technician/medical laboratory technician.
medical record administrator one responsible for the indexing, recording, and storage of medical records and reports of patients admitted to hospitals and other health care agencies, and who also prepares reports of births, deaths, transfers, and discharges of patients, and of treatments received.

There are two levels of qualification for the medical record practitioner: Registered Record Administrator (RRA) and Accredited Record Technician (ART). Only those persons who have passed the registration examination of the american health information management association are entitled to use the professional designation of Registered Record Administrator or the job titles of medical record administrator and health record administrator. Only individuals who have passed the accreditation examination of the Association are entitled to use the designation of Accredited Record Technician. Suitable job titles for the RRA might include: Medical Record Administrator; Director, Medical Record Administration Program; Director, Medical Record Services; Instructor; Coordinator; and Research Associate. Suitable job titles for the ART might include: Medical Record Technician; Director; Assistant Director; Supervisor; and Instructor.

MRA

Abbreviation for MR angiography.

MRA

Medical Record Administrator.

MRA

Abbreviation for:
magnetic resonance angiography (see there) 
malignant rheumatoid arthritis
medial right abdomen
medical records administrator 
medical research associate
medical risk assessment
mean right atrial
multiple regression analysis
multivariate regression analysis

MRA

Magnetic resonance angiography, see MR angiography.

MRA

Abbreviation for magnetic resonance angiography.

angiography

(an″jē-og′ră-fē) [ angio- + -graphy]
1. A description of blood vessels and lymphatics.
2. Diagnostic or therapeutic radiography of the heart and blood vessels with a radiopaque contrast medium. Types include magnetic resonance angiography, interventional radiology, and computed tomography.

Patient care

Before the procedure: health care professionals explain to the patient how a needle or catheter will be used to penetrate a blood vessel, and that a contrast agent will be injected into it to highlight the course of the vessel (map the vessel) and any abnormalities in it or associated with it. These abnormalities may include widenings and weaknesses in the blood vessels (aneurysms); narrowings of the vessel (stenoses or obstructions); abnormal connections between arteries and veins (fistulae); or unusual networks of vessels (arteriovenous malformations or in some cases, the complex blood supply of malignant tumors). Complications of angiography include damage to the blood vessel or neighboring tissues, bleeding or bruising, cardiac arrhythmias, syncope, infection, or, in very rare instances, death. These potential complications should be fully reviewed with the patient during the informed consent that precedes the procedure.

During the procedure: the patient’s heart rate and rhythm are closely monitored, along with his or her blood pressure, oxygenation, mental status, and in critically ill patients, urinary output. The patient may experience a hot flush during the injection of contrast, palpitations, or other unusual sensations. These sensations should be explained to the patient before they occur to minimize anxiety. Anxiolytics or sedatives may sometimes be administered to patients as needed.

After the procedure: the puncture site is tamponaded and bandaged and then monitored for signs of bleeding or bruising. The part of the body distal to the puncture site is periodically assessed for pulse, color, warmth, sensation, and movement. The patient is permitted to mobilize only after the puncture site is stabilized and institutional protocols are completed.

3. Recording of arterial pulse movements with a sphygmograph. angiographic (-ŏ-graf′ik), adjectiveangiographically

aortic angiography

Angiography of the aorta and its branches.

cardiac angiography

Angiography of the heart and coronary arteries.

catheter angiography

Angiography performed after a small tube is placed in a blood vessel and a contrast medium is injected to outline the internal structure of the blood vessel.

cerebral angiography

Angiography of the vascular system of the brain.
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CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY: A. tight stenosis; B. artery reopened with a stent
Enlarge picture
CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY: A. tight stenosis; B. artery reopened with a stent

coronary angiography

Angiography of the coronary arteries to determine any pathological obstructions to blood flow to the heart muscle. It is used to provide definitive images of the coronary arteries that reveal atherosclerotic blockage to blood flow so that those blockages can be surgically bypassed, opened (with angioplasty or stenting, for example), or treated with medications.

CAUTION!

Potential hazards of the procedure include coronary artery dissection, kidney failure resulting from exposure to angiographic contrast, and radiation exposure.
See: illustration

CT pulmonary angiography

The best contemporary test to assess a patient suspected of having a pulmonary embolism The test uses computed tomographic imaging of the pulmonary arteries to identify blood clots in the right ventricular outflow tracts or the pulmonary arteries. The presence of a clot indicates the need for treatment with anticoagulant drugs. It is used as the generally preferred alternative to invasive pulmonary angiography (which, while accurate, requires right ventricular catheterization), or to ventilation/perfusion scanning of the lungs (which often yields indeterminate results).

CAUTION!

Potential hazards of the test include its radiation exposure, its risk for renal failure (esp. in patients with predisposing conditions for kidney injury), and the risk of allergy to the radiological contrast agent used in the test.

digital subtraction angiography

Use of a computer to investigate arterial blood circulation. A reference image is obtained by fluoroscopy. Then a contrast medium is injected intravenously. Another image is produced from the fluoroscopic image, after which the computer technique subtracts the image produced by surrounding tissues. The third image is an enhanced view of the arteries.
Enlarge picture
INTRAVENOUS FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAM

intravenous fluorescein angiography

Abbreviation: IVFA
The optimal diagnostic test to evaluate the vascular status of the retina and choroid. Fluorescein dye is injected into an arm vein and sequential photographs are taken of the fundus as the dye circulates at different time intervals.
See: illustration

magnetic resonance angiography

Abbreviation: MRA
Noninvasive imaging of blood vessels by magnetic resonance imaging. The technique does not expose patients to ionizing radiation and avoids catheterization of the vessels. It has been used to study aneurysms, blockages, and other diseases of the carotid, coronary, femoral, iliac, and renal arteries. Studies may be done with or without contrast agents.

PHI-motion angiography

A laser imaging test to identify abnormal blood vessels in the choroidal layer beneath the retina. These abnormal vessels may leak, causing central visual field loss in age-related macular degeneration.

pulmonary angiography

Angiography of the pulmonary vessels (e.g., in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism).

selective angiography

Angiography in which a catheter is introduced directly into the vessel to be visualized.

magnetic resonance angiography

Abbreviation: MRA
Noninvasive imaging of blood vessels by magnetic resonance imaging. The technique does not expose patients to ionizing radiation and avoids catheterization of the vessels. It has been used to study aneurysms, blockages, and other diseases of the carotid, coronary, femoral, iliac, and renal arteries. Studies may be done with or without contrast agents.
See also: angiography
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