MLD

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Related to MLDS: MDLS

dose

 [dōs]
the quantity to be administered at one time, as a specified amount of medication or a given quantity of radiation.
absorbed dose that amount of energy from ionizing radiations absorbed per unit mass of matter, expressed in rads.
air dose the intensity of an x-ray or gamma-ray beam in air, expressed in roentgens.
booster dose an amount of immunogen (vaccine, toxoid, or other antigen preparation), usually smaller than the original amount, injected at an appropriate interval after primary immunization to sustain the immune response to that immunogen.
curative dose (CD) a dose that is sufficient to restore normal health. See also median curative dose.
divided dose fractionated dose.
effective dose (ED) that quantity of a drug that will produce the effects for which it is administered. See also median effective dose.
erythema dose that amount of radiation that, when applied to the skin, causes erythema (temporary reddening).
fatal dose lethal dose.
fractionated dose a fraction of the total dose prescribed, as of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, to be given at intervals, usually during a 24-hour period.
infective dose (ID) that amount of a pathogenic agent that will cause infection in susceptible subjects. See also median infective dose and tissue culture infective dose.
lethal dose (LD) that quantity of an agent that will or may be sufficient to cause death. See also median lethal dose and minimum lethal dose.
loading dose a dose of medication, often larger than subsequent doses, administered for the purpose of establishing a therapeutic level of the medication.
maintenance dose the amount of a medication administered to maintain a desired level of the medication in the blood.
maximum tolerated dose tolerance dose.
maximum permissible dose the largest amount of ionizing radiation that one may safely receive within a specified period according to recommended limits in current radiation protection guides. The specific amounts vary with age and circumstance.
median curative dose (CD50) a dose that abolishes symptoms in 50 per cent of test subjects.
median effective dose (ED50) a dose that produces the desired effect in 50 per cent of a population.
median infective dose (ID50) that amount of pathogenic microorganisms that will produce demonstrable infection in 50 per cent of the test subjects.
median lethal dose (LD50) the quantity of an agent that will kill 50 per cent of the test subjects; in radiology, the amount of radiation that will kill, within a specified period, 50 per cent of individuals in a large group or population.
median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) that amount of a pathogenic agent that will produce infection in 50 per cent of cell cultures inoculated.
minimum lethal dose
1. the amount of toxin that will just kill an experimental animal.
2. the smallest quantity of diphtheria toxin that will kill a guinea pig of 250-gm weight in 4 to 5 days when injected subcutaneously.
reference dose an estimate of the daily exposure to a substance for humans that is assumed to be without appreciable risk; it is calculated using the no observed adverse effect level and is more conservative than the older margin of safety.
skin dose (SD)
1. the air dose of radiation at the skin surface, comprising the primary radiation plus backscatter.
2. the absorbed dose in the skin.
threshold dose the minimum dose of ionizing radiation, a chemical, or a drug that will produce a detectable degree of any given effect.
threshold erythema dose (TED) the single skin dose that will produce, in 80 per cent of those tested, a faint but definite erythema within 30 days, and in the other 20 per cent, no visible reaction.
tissue culture infective dose (TCID) that amount of a pathogenic agent that will produce infection when inoculated on tissue cultures; used with a numeric qualifier.
tolerance dose the largest quantity of an agent that may be administered without harm. Called also maximum tolerated dose.

MLD

, mld
Abbreviation for minimal lethal dose.

MLD

median lethal dose; minimum lethal dose.

MLD

abbr.
minimum lethal dose

MLD

abbreviation for minimum lethal dose.

MLD

Abbreviation for:
manual lymphatic drainage (see there) 
masking level difference (see there)
median lethal dose
metachromatic leukodystrophy (see there)
microlumbar discectomy (see there)
minimal lumen diameter
minimum lethal dose (see there)
minimum lumen diameter
myelin deficiency

MLD

1. Median lethal dose.
3. Minimum lethal dose, see there.

MLD

Abbreviation for manual lymph drainage; metachromatic leukodystrophy; minimal lethal dose.

drainage

(dran'ij)
The flow or withdrawal of fluids, such as blood, infused saline, pus, and collected debris, from a cavity, organ, surgical site, or wound. See: autodrainage; drain

active drainage

Drainage in which negative pressure is maintained in the drainage tube. It is used in treating pneumothorax and in certain types of drains or catheters in the intestinal tract, body cavity, or surgical wound. Synonym: negative pressure drainage; suction drainage. See: Wound Drainage Systems: Negative Pressure

autogenic drainage

A diaphragmatic breathing pattern used by patients with respiratory illnesses (e.g., cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis) to clear the lungs of mucus and other secretions. Various techniques are used, all of which combine positive reinforcement of deep breathing and voluntary cough suppression for as long as possible before evacuating the airways of mucus.

capillary drainage

Drainage by means of capillary attraction.

chest drainage

Placement of a drainage tube in the chest cavity, usually in the pleural space. The tube is used to drain air, fluid, or blood from the pleural space so the compressed and collapsed lung can expand. The tube is connected to a system that produces suction. This helps to remove the material from the pleural space and also prevents air from being sucked into the space.

closed drainage

Drainage of a wound or body space into a self-contained, sealed collecting system.

closed sterile drainage

A sterile tube draining a body site, such as the abdominal cavity or pleural space, that is designed to prevent the entry of air and bacteria into the tubing or the area being drained.

lymphatic drainage

Manual lymphatic drainage.

manual lymphatic drainage

Abbreviation: MLD
Gentle massage techniques used to correct localized lymphedema, e.g., in patients who have swelling of an arm after mastectomy with lymph node dissection. The therapist assists lymphatic flow from the extremity toward the heart. Synonym: lymphatic drainage

negative pressure drainage

Active drainage.

open drainage

Drainage of a wound or body cavity using absorbent materials or catheters that are in contact with the ambient conditions outside the patient.
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: posterior apical segments of the right and left upper lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: anterior apical segments of the right and left upper lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: anterior apical segments of the right and left upper lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: anterior segments of the right and left upper lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: posterior segment of the left upper lobe
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: posterior segment of the right upper lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: left lingula
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: right middle lobe
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: anterior basal segments of the right and left lung
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: posterior basal segments of the right and left lung
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: left lateral segment of the lower lobes
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POSTURAL DRAINAGE OF LUNGS: superior segment of the right and left lower lobes

postural drainage

A passive airway clearance technique in which patients are positioned so that gravity will assist the removal of secretions from specific lobes of the lung, bronchi, or lung cavities. It can be used for patients with pneumonia, chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, inhaled foreign bodies, before surgery for lobectomy, or in any patient having difficulty with retained secretions. A side effect of the treatment in some patients is gastroesophageal reflux. See: illustration

Patient care

Physical tolerance to the procedure is evaluated. The respiratory therapist teaches and assists the patient in the procedure, as ordered, by positioning the patient for effective drainage of the affected lung region(s). The patient is encouraged to remove secretions with an effective cough. To decrease the risk of aspiration, the patient should not perform the procedure after meals. Chest vibration and percussion are often performed at the same time to assist movement of retained secretions in the lung.

suction drainage

Active drainage.

through-and-through drainage

Irrigation and drainage of a cavity or an organ such as the bladder by placing two perforated tubes, drains, or catheters in the area. A solution is instilled through one catheter, and the other tube collects the returned fluid actively (by suction) or passively.

tidal drainage

A method, controlled mechanically, of filling the bladder with solution by gravity and periodically emptying the bladder with a catheter. It is usually used when the patient lacks bladder control as in injuries or lesions of the spinal cord.

Wangensteen drainage

See: Wangensteen tube

manual lymphatic drainage

Abbreviation: MLD
Gentle massage techniques used to correct localized lymphedema, e.g., in patients who have swelling of an arm after mastectomy with lymph node dissection. The therapist assists lymphatic flow from the extremity toward the heart. Synonym: lymphatic drainage
See also: drainage

MLD

Abbrev. for minimum lethal dose. This is the smallest quantity known to have caused death.

MLD

Abbreviation for minimal lethal dose.

MLD,

MLD

minimum lethal dose.