Mycobacterium bovis

(redirected from M. bovis)

My·co·bac·te·ri·um bo·'vis

a bacterial species that is the primary cause of tuberculosis in cattle; transmissible to humans and other animals, causing tuberculosis.
Synonym(s): tubercle bacillus (2)

Mycobacterium bovis

a species of bacteria that causes tuberculosis in cattle and other animals and is transmitted to humans by the ingestion of raw milk contaminated by the microorganism.

Mycobacterium bovis

A mycobacterium that causes a TB-like infection in cows; before pasteurization was common, M bovis spread to humans via contaminated milk

My·co·bac·te·ri·um bo·vis

(mī'kō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm bō'vis)
A bacterial species that is the primary cause of tuberculosis in cattle; transmissible to humans and other animals, causing tuberculosis.
Synonym(s): tubercle bacillus (2) .

Mycobacterium

the only genus in the family Mycobacteriaceae of bacteria; slender acid-fast rods which may be straight or slightly curved. They may produce filaments or cocci. The most serious disease caused by members of this genus is tuberculosis. M. fortuitum, M. chelonea, M. marinum are listed as causes of piscine tuberculosis. Other species, including M. aquae, M. kansasii and M. scrofulaceum, may occasionally cause disease in a number of different species.

Mycobacterium avium
found mostly in birds but occasionally also in other animals and in humans. The tubercle bacillus of birds, it causes avian tuberculosis.
Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis
causes Johne's disease in cattle, sheep, goats, deer and camelids. Previously called M. johnei and M. paratuberculosis.
Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare
complex see M. intracellulare (below).
Mycobacterium bovis
the tubercle bacillus of the bovine, it causes tuberculosis in many animal species and humans.
Mycobacterium chelonei, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium phlei, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium thermoresistible
cause disease in a number of animal species, including mastitis in cattle and cutaneous mycobacterial granuloma in cats and dogs. See also opportunist (atypical) mycobacteria.
Mycobacterium farcinogenes, Mycobacterium senegalense
associated with bovine farcy.
Mycobacterium genovense
causes mycobacteriosis in birds.
Mycobacterium intracellulare
found in tuberculin-positive cattle and causes limited lymph node lesions in pigs. Closely related to M. avium and also described as M. avium-intracellulare complex.
Mycobacterium johnei
see M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (above).
Mycobacterium kansasii
causes tuberculosis-like disease in pigs, deer and cattle.
Mycobacterium leprae
the cause of leprosy in humans.
Mycobacterium lepraemurium
causes murine and feline leprosy.
Mycobacterium marinum
found in water, it causes tuberculosis in fish and skin ulcers in humans.
Mycobacterium microti
the vole bacillus; lesions sometimes occur in other species.
Mycobacterium paratuberculosis
previously called M. johnei. See M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (above).
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
the tubercle bacillus of humans, but found also in monkeys and pigs, and rarely in cattle, dogs and parrots.
Mycobacterium ulcerans
causes skin ulcers in humans and cats.
Mycobacterium xenopi
causes mycobacterial granuloma in cats and lymph node lesions in pigs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bovine TB was confirmed for 9 animals, 1 of which died naturally and 8 of which were sent to slaughter for postmortem examination and collection of samples for M.
Because of inadequate clinical improvement, advanced diagnostic techniques were used and M.
Although the wild animals and cattle commonly do not come in contact with each other, transmission of M.
Like Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the TB germ that infects people, the animal-infecting M.
We conducted a retrospective review of California tuberculosis (TB) registry and genotyping data to evaluate trends, analyze epidemiologic differences between adult and child case-patients with Mycobacterium bovis disease, and identify risk factors for M.
tuberculosis (the primary agent of TB in humans) and M.
5% of the human TB cases in the Netherlands were still caused by M.
This case of presumed reactivation of peritoneal TB caused by M.
Given the susceptibility of these European breeds to bovine TB and the initial absence of effective disease control, as the Holstein Friesian herd increased in number, infections with M.
We report a molecular epidemiology study that used spoligotyping, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units--variable-number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing, and region of difference (RD) typing of M.
We conducted a retrospective analysis of TB case surveillance data from the San Diego, California, region from 1994 through 2005 to estimate incidence trends, identify correlates of M.