M:E ratio

M:E ra·ti·o

the ratio of myeloid to erythroid precursors in bone marrow; normally it varies from 2:1 to 4:1; an increased ratio is found in infections, chronic myelogenous leukemia, or erythroid hypoplasia; a decreased ratio may mean a depression of leukopoiesis or normoblastic hyperplasia depending on the overall cellularity of the bone marrow.

M:E ratio

The ratio of maturing myeloid cells to erythroid cells in the bone marrow, which is normally 3–4:1.

Decreased M:E
Haemolytic and megaloblastic anaemias.

Increased M:E
CML, leukaemoid reactions.

Normal M:E
Does not reflect changes, as both series are equally affected—e.g., in aplastic anaemia, myelosclerosis, chloramphenicol toxicity.

M:E ra·ti·o

(rā'shē-ō)
The ratio of myeloid:erythroid precursors in bone marrow; normally it varies from 2:1 to 4:1. An increased ratio is caused by infections, chronic myelogenous leukemia, or erythroid hypoplasia; a decreased ratio may mean a depression of leukopoiesis or normoblastic hyperplasia, depending on the overall cellularity of the bone marrow.

M:E ratio

myeloid:erythroid ratio.

Patient discussion about M:E ratio

Q. Q. I want to know about urine protein creatine ratio in diagnosing nephrotic syndrome. Please explain interms of unit such as mg/mg or mmol/mg. Normal range, nephrotic range with good referrence.

A. Nephrotic syndrome is defines as a damage to the kidneys, in which there is a leak of large amounts of protein (over 3.5 grams of protein / 24 hours urine output) from the blood to the urine. Protein loss causes low protein count in the blood (hypoalbuminemia) and edemas (excess fluid in the interstitial cavity which is between the cells, causes leg swelling most often, and also in the adbomen and around the eyes).

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