lysosome

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lysosome

 [li´so-sōm]
one of the minute bodies occurring in many types of cells, containing various hydrolytic enzymes and normally involved in the process of localized intracellular digestion. adj., adj lysoso´mal.

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm),
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle measuring 5-8 nm (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria, as well as effete organelles of the cells.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]

lysosome

/ly·so·some/ (li´so-sōm) one of the minute bodies occurring in many types of cells, containing various hydrolytic enzymes and normally involved in the process of localized intracellular digestion.lysoso´mal
secondary lysosome  one that has fused with a phagosome (or pinosome), bringing hydrolases in contact with the ingested material and resulting in digestion of the material.

lysosome

(lī′sə-sōm′)
n.
A membrane-bound organelle in the cytoplasm of most cells containing various hydrolytic enzymes that function in intracellular digestion.

ly′so·so′mal adj.

lysosome

[lī′səsōm]
Etymology: Gk, lysein + soma, body
a cytoplasmic, membrane-bound particle that contains hydrolytic enzymes that function in intracellular digestive processes. The organelles are found in most cells but are particularly prominent in leukocytes and the cells of the liver and kidney. If the hydrolytic enzymes are released into the cytoplasm, they cause self-digestion of the cell. Thus lysosomes may play an important role in certain self-destructive diseases characterized by the wasting of tissue, such as muscular dystrophy.

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm)
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle measuring 5-8 nm (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria, as well as effete organelles of the cells.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]

lysosome

One of the types of ORGANELLE found in cell cytoplasm. Lysosomes contain various hydrolytic enzymes capable of digesting large molecules (macromolecules), the products of which can then leave the lysosomes. Injury to lysosomes may release enzymes that can damage the cell.

lysosome

a cytoplasmic organelle of EUKARYOTE cells that contains hydrolytic enzymes and is thought to be produced by the GOLGI APPARATUS. The sac-like structure is surrounded by a single-layered membrane which is impermeable and resistant to the enzymes inside. Lysosomes can act as the digestive system of the cell. When the sac ruptures the enzymes are released into a food vacuole produced by PHAGOCYTOSIS, thus enabling the breakdown of ingested materials.

Lysosome

Membrane-enclosed compartment in cells, containing many hydrolytic enzymes; where large molecules and cellular components are broken down.
Mentioned in: Mucopolysaccharidoses

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm)
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]

lysosome

a small intracellular organelle occurring in the cytoplasm of most cells, containing various hydrolytic enzymes and normally involved in the process of localized intracellular digestion. Lysosomes are particularly prominent in certain cells such as granulocytes, in which they are the granules, and activated macrophages. They play a major role in intracellular killing of microorganisms, destruction of foreign or damaged tissues, and in embryogenesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Detergent was required to solubilize ceramide-containing substrates, and detergent was well tolerated by the other lysosomal enzymes that acted on water-soluble substrates.
MPS type1 and similar genetic disorders are known as lysosomal storage disease, which are caused by the body's inability to produce specific lysosomal enzymes.
LSDs result in the accumulation of macromolecular substrates that would normally be degraded by lysosomal enzymes.
In the proposed clinical trial, HuCNS-SC will be transplanted in the CLN1 and CLN2 patients in part to determine if the transplanted cells secrete the missing lysosomal enzymes in the brains of affected individuals.
Researchers were able to genetically insert into the cells a gene that produces a critical lysosomal enzyme (called IDUA) and then inject the engineered cells into mice to treat the disorder.
It is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha glucosidase which leads to the accumulation of glycogen in myocyte lysosomes and results in cell death.
Gelb and colleagues designed a method to directly analyze the activity of endogenous lysosomal enzymes by using electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS/MS (46-49).
Amicus has discovered an apparent link between various lysosomal enzymes and accumulation of the beta-amyloid and p-tau deposits observed in the brain of Alzheimer's patients.
The multiplex lysosomal enzyme assay screens for 5 lysosomal enzymes, and performs the enzyme reactions separately and measures the products simultaneously by using tandem mass spectrometry.
Lysosomal diseases are hereditary defects of the lysosomal enzymes that break down and recycle carbohydrates or sugar chains in the body.
We observed that estrogen can increase tumor growth as well as the expression of cathepsin-B, one of the lysosomal enzymes that metabolize XYOTAX, releasing the active chemotherapy agent, paclitaxel.

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