Lupinus


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Related to Lupinus: Lupinus albus, Lupinus arboreus, Lupinus perennis

Lupinus

temperate zone plant genus of the Fabaceae family of legumes; mature plants can cause several syndromes (the green plants are safe): (1) convulsions after exercise due to alkaloids in the seeds; (2) liver damage caused by fungal toxins (phomopsins) produced by Phomopsis spp. growing on the crop stubble or in the seeds, which also causes intermittent photosensitization (called also lupinosis); (3) possibly precipitation of acute attacks of copper poisoning; (4) skeletal myopathy; and (5) pregnancy toxemia and acetonemia in cows. Includes L. albus, L. albicaulis, L. alpestris, L. andersonii, L. angustifolius, L. arboreus, L. argenteus, L. burkei, L. cosentini (L. digitatus), L. cumulicola, L. cyaneus, L. erectus, L. evermannii, L. formosus, L. greenei, L. latifolius, L. leucophyllus, L. leucopsis, L. littoralis, L. luteus, L. montigenus, L. nootkatensis, L. onustus, L. perennis, L. polyphyllus, L. pusillus, L. spathulatus, L. varius.

Lupinus caudatus, Lupinus laxiflorus, Lupinus sericeus
these plants, together with many other Lupinus spp., contain quinolizidine alkaloids (anagyrine), the cause of the crooked calf syndrome, in which calves are born with limbs in excessive flexion, rotated, generally malpositioned, and malaligned.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the objectives of this research were to determine the concentration of major (K, Na, Mg, Ca), trace (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn), and toxic (Pb, Cd) elements in dry (raw) and processed white lupin samples using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS), to compare the levels of elements found in raw with the processed Lupinus albus and to correlate the levels of the identified elements in raw commercially available white lupin and processed white lupin for multipurpose case.
1993), and responses of root growth and nitrate uptake to heterogeneous nitrate supply differ between Lupinus angustifolius (dominant tap root and primary lateral system) and L.
However, four Fender's blue butterfly populations are known to feed on either Lupinus albicaulis (sickle-keeled lupine) or L.
Lupinus perennis (Table 2) is a prime example of a potentially threatened plant species that also serves as a host for the larvae of the Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis), itself a nationally endangered species (Grundel and others 1998).
Best are Lupinus nanus `Pixie Delight', only 50cm (1ft 8ins) tall, in shades of blue, pink and white, and Lupinus texenis, the Texas bluebonnet.
The example of the developed model taking into account the climatic parameters of the spatial pattern of habitat, which are the potential for the invasion of Lupinus polyphyllus is shown by Fig.
Other species-rich paramo taxa, such as Valeriana, Gentianella, and Lupinus, are equally fascinating examples of adaptive radiation in the northern Andes (von Hagen & Kadereit, 2001; Bell & Donoghue, 2005; Hughes & Eastwood, 2006).
4) Pinus hartwegi forest (4-20m high) between 2900 to 3000 meters and is associated with Lupinus cacuminus, Euphorbia furcillata, Senecio coahuilensis, S.
Isoflavones isolated from Lupinus argenteus act in synergy with norfloxacin against a mutant of S.
Abundant forbs were Agalinis tenuifolia (slender gerardia), Aster oolentangiensis, Comandra umbellata (star toadflax), Conyza canadensis (horseweed), Eupborbia corollata (flowering spurge), Fragaria virginiana, Lechea leggettii (pinweed), Lupinus perennis (wild lupine), Phlox pilosa (prairie phlox), Potentilla simplex, Pleridium aquilinum, Rubus flagellaris, and Solidago nemoralis (gray goldenrod).