Low transverse incision

Low transverse incision

Incision made horizontally across the lower end of the uterus; this kind of incision is preferred for less bleeding and stronger healing.
Mentioned in: Cesarean Section
References in periodicals archive ?
7% for women with a prior low transverse incision, 2.
The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) now recommends that most women with one previous cesarean delivery and with a low transverse incision be counseled about VBAC and offered a trial of labor.
A low transverse incision is the preferred technique for abdominal hysterectomy.
So if there's a chance of doing a low transverse incision, take it.
Historically when the lower segment has been too small or has had fibroids or adhesions, physicians have avoided trying a low transverse incision for fear that if it had to be converted to a T incision, patients would ultimately do worse than if they had a classical vertical incision initially, explained Dr.
But some patients just may get away with a low transverse incision, and they won't experience any greater degree of morbidity or mortality if they don't, according to the findings of this study.
5% and 1% in women who have a prior low vertical or low transverse incision.
ACOG states that a woman with two or more previous cesareans deliveries with low transverse incisions who wishes to plan a VBAC should not be discouraged from doing so in the absence of contraindications.
Whenever possible, and especially when the woman plans to have children, we make a transverse incision, as cesarean-section data of vertical versus low transverse incisions demonstrate that the strongest closure is obtained from transverse incisions.
Low transverse incisions (Pfannenstiel, Maylard, Cherney) have a far lower rate of dehiscence than do midline incisions.
There is no "safe zone" for placement of low transverse incisions that will reliably avoid the ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerves, although careful placement of lower abdominal laparoscopic trocars can minimize the chance of nerve injury, Dr.