longus colli muscle


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lon·gus col·li mus·cle

(long'gŭs kol'ī mŭs'ĕl)
Medial part: origin, the bodies of the third thoracic to the fifth cervical vertebrae; insertion, the bodies of the second to fourth cervical vertebrae; superolateral part: origin, the anterior tubercles of the transverse processes of the third to fifth cervical vertebrae; insertion, the anterior tubercle of the atlas; inferolateral part: origin, the bodies of the first to third thoracic vertebrae; insertion, the anterior tubercles of the transverse processes of the fifth and sixth cervical vertebrae; action, for all three parts, twist neck and flex neck anteriorly; nerve supply, for all three parts, ventral primary rami of cervical spinal nerves (cervical plexus).
Synonym(s): musculus longus colli [TA] , long muscle of neck.
References in periodicals archive ?
MRI findings demonstrated a smooth retropharyngeal effusion extending from the skull base to the C5 level and asymmetric edema of the left longus colli muscle (Figure 2).
1-3) The longus colli muscles are close in proximity to pharyngeal constrictors and also overlay the prevertebral space.
Acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle (CTLC) is a rare and self-limiting inflammatory disorder of the tendon insertions.
Ring et al reported a series of 5 cases in which patients initially received unnecessary medical treatments, including 1 case in which the patient underwent an open biopsy that suggested the histopathologic basis of this condition: a foreign-body inflammatory response to calcium hydroxyapatite deposition into the longus colli muscle.
The radiographic features of calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis include prevertebral soft-tissue swelling between C1 and C4 along with amorphous calcific density in the longus colli muscle tendon anterior to the body of C2 and inferior to the anterior arch of C1.
hydroxyapatite crystals in the superior oblique tendon fibers of the longus colli muscle.
1-3) The longus colli muscle extends from the anterior arch C1 to the T3 vertebrae.
Acute calcific tendonitis of the longus colli muscle
A radiologic finding of an amorphous soft-tissue calcification in the longus colli muscle at the level of C1 or C2 is considered pathognomonic for prevertebral calcific tendinitis.
It is related to calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the superior oblique fibers of the longus colli muscle.
The correct imaging diagnosis is based on (1) the presence of pathognomonic calcification in the superior tendon fibers of the longus colli muscle, (2) the presence of fluid within the retropharyngeal space without associated enhancement around the effusion, (3) the absence of inflammatory retropharyngeal lymph nodes, (4) the absence of any bony destruction of the adjacent cervical vertebrae, and (5) recognition of the variability in the degree of tendinous calcium deposition, which may range from subtle to the more typical marked globular amorphous appearance.
The mechanisms triggering haemorrhage into the retropharyngeal space are thought to be due to injury to the longus colli muscles on the anterior surface of the vertebral bodies, the anterior longitudinal ligament or the anterior muscular and spinal branches of the vertebral artery (3).