longus colli

longus colli

a muscle that flexes the neck anteriorly and laterally, with slight rotation to the opposite side.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sagittal CECT scan of the neck shows amorphous calcification of the longus colli muscle and a retropharyngeal effusion (red arrow).
The cervical segment is supported by the longus colli muscle anteriorly and the semispinalis cervicis and cervical multifidus muscles posteriorly.
Cervicothoracic ganglion was located at the first intercostal space and ventrolateral side of longus colli muscle.
Whilst fluoroscopy is a reliable method for identifying the nerve structures, ultrasound allows for the identification of the vertebral vessels, the thyroid gland and vessels, the longus colli muscle, the nerve roots and the esophagus.
The following muscles may be found to be lengthened and taut/tight: rhomboids, middle and lower trapezius, serratus anterior, longus colli and capitis, infraspinatus and teres minor, and thoracic paraspinals (erector spinae and transversospinalis).
Acute calcific longus colli tendonitis (ACLCT) is an inflammatory response of the prevertebral neck musculature due to pathognomonic calcium hydroxapatite deposition in the longus colli tendon at the vertebral body level of C1-C2.
The brown/beige markers P2RX5 and PAT2 were detected in the carotid sheath and longus colli areas around the neck, where thermogenic fat cells are present, whereas the white fat cell marker ASC-1 was much more prominent in the subcutaneous and omental fat depots, both of which predominantly consist of white adipocytes.
Acute calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle (CTLC) is a rare and self-limiting inflammatory disorder of the tendon insertions.
It is in the submucosal plane between the longus colli muscles without any inflammatory changes.
Acute retropharyngeal tendinitis (calcific tendinitis of the longus colli), initially described by Hartley in 1964, is an acute inflammatory condition of the longus colli tendon.
The mechanisms triggering haemorrhage into the retropharyngeal space are thought to be due to injury to the longus colli muscles on the anterior surface of the vertebral bodies, the anterior longitudinal ligament or the anterior muscular and spinal branches of the vertebral artery (3).
Affected patients generally present with an inflammation of the longus colli muscle tendon.