lockjaw

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lockjaw

 [lok´jaw]

tris·mus

(triz'mŭs),
Persistent contraction of the masseter muscles due to failure of central inhibition; often the initial manifestation of generalized tetanus.
Synonym(s): Ankylostoma (2) , lock-jaw, lockjaw
[L. fr. G. trismos, a creaking, rasping]

lockjaw

/lock·jaw/ (lok´jaw)

lockjaw

(lŏk′jô′)
n.
1. See tetanus.
2. An early sign of tetanus, in which there is difficulty opening the jaw because of a tonic spasm of the muscles of mastication. Also called trismus.

lockjaw

lockjaw

(1) Tetanus, see there.
(2) Trismus, see there.

lockjaw

Tetanus, trismus Spasm of the masseter muscles with stiffness of the jaw caused by tetanospasmin, a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani, which causes an unrestrained muscle firing, and sustained muscular contraction which, if severe, causes dysphagia or acute respiratory insufficiency by causing prolonged diaphragm contraction

tris·mus

(triz'mŭs)
Persistent contraction of the masseter muscles due to failure of central inhibition; often the initial manifestation of generalized tetanus.
Synonym(s): lockjaw.
[L. fr. G. trismos, a creaking, rasping]

lockjaw

A lay term for uncontrollable contraction (spasm) of the powerful chewing muscles that occurs in established TETANUS. The spasm clamps the teeth together so that they can barely be separated. The medical term is trismus.

tris·mus

(triz'mŭs)
Persistent contraction of masseter muscles due to failure of central inhibition; often initial manifestation of generalized tetanus.
Synonym(s): ankylostoma, lockjaw.
[L. fr. G. trismos, a creaking, rasping]

lockjaw

1. tetanus.
2. trismus.
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It's so well-preserved that in the dungeons it's not difficult to imagine lions being led through the gates into the arena, ready to lock jaws with the gladiators.