linoleic acid

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linoleic acid

 [lin″o-le´ik]
an essential fatty acid that cannot be synthesized by animal tissues and must be obtained in the diet.

lin·o·le·ic ac·id

(lin'ō-lē'ik as'id), Do not confuse this word with linolenic acid.
9,12-Octadecadienoic acid; a doubly unsaturated 18-carbon fatty acid, occurring widely in plant glycerides, that is essential in nutrition in mammals.
Synonym(s): linolic acid
[L. linum, flax, + oleum, oil]

linoleic acid

/lin·o·le·ic ac·id/ (lin″o-le´ik) a polyunsaturated fatty acid, occurring as a major constituent of many vegetable oils; it is used in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and cell membranes.

linoleic acid

(lĭn′ə-lē′ĭk)
n.
An unsaturated fatty acid, C18H32O2, that is considered essential to the human diet. It is an important component of drying oils, such as linseed oil.

linoleic acid

[lin′əlē′ik]
Etymology: Gk, linon, flax, oleum, oil
a colorless to straw-colored essential fatty acid with two unsaturated bonds, occurring in many vegetable oils, such as corn, soy, and safflower oils. Commercially produced linoleic acid is used in margarine and animal feeds.

linoleic acid

An essential 18-carbon fatty acid with two unsaturated bonds which derived from plant oils.

lin·o·le·ic ac·id

(lin'ō-lē'ik as'id) Do not confuse this word with linolenic acid.
Doubly unsaturated 18-carbon fatty acid, occurring widely in plant glycerides; essential in nutrition in mammals.
[L. linum, flax, + oleum, oil]

linoleic acid

The principle fatty acid in plant seed oils. An essential polyunsaturated fatty acid, interconvertible with LINOLENIC ACID and arachidonic acid and needed for cell membranes and the synthesis of PROSTAGLANDINS. It is plentiful in vegetable fats. Essential fatty acid dietary deficiency is rare.

linoleic acid

or

essential fatty acid

an unsaturated fatty acid that cannot be synthesized in the human body and is therefore described as ‘essential’. Deficiency of linoleic acid in the diet results in increased metabolic activity, failure in growth and even death.

linoleic acid

(lin´əlē´ik),
n an unsaturated fatty acid essential to nutrition. Linoleic acid occurs in many plant glycerides.

linoleic acid

an essential fatty acid; contains 18 carbons and 2 double bonds at carbons 9, 10 and 12,13; precursor of n-6 or omega 6 fatty acids; the major unsaturated fatty acid found in vegetable oils.

linoleic acid acid deficiency
dry, scaling skin and alopecia have been reported in cats deficient in linoleic acid. Dietary deficiency occurs in cats fed diets low in fat, containing rancid fat, or with little or no animal-source fats.
References in periodicals archive ?
A control sample and milk enhanced with conjugated linoleic acid were processed into pasteurized milk, butter and fermented milk products.
The groundbreaking formula was inspired by human clinical research conducted at Ohio State University that compared HLA with CLA (conjugated linoleic acid) in a double blind cross-over study in 35 obese, Type 2 diabetic post-menopausal women) over two 16 week periods with a 4-week washout," according to Rob Maru, Chief Innovation Officer at Re-Body.
5) indicates that linoleic acid, oleic acid, and DHEA-S are more significant than lysoPC, since more individuals in the control group are localized below the baseline, whereas the majority of patients are correctly assigned to the IPD group.
The intervention was replacement of dietary saturated fats (from animal fats, common margarines and shortenings) with omega 6 linoleic acid (from safflower oil and safflower oil polyunsaturated margarine).
Oil quality is related to fatty acid composition, especially with content of essential fatty acid like as linoleic and oleic acids.
The first is linoleic acid (LA), which is found in corn, safflower, soybean, sunflower, and cottonseed oil.
Elysian, MN, USA) was the source of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) with the reported isomer content as follows: 39.
c) There are substantial discrepancies between the total fatty acid and free fatty acid profiles in samples V and VI: particularly for lauric and oleic acids in V, and for lauric, myristic and linoleic acids in VI.
The major fatty acids were oleic and linoleic which accounted for 77.
2+] chelating ability, and antioxidant activity in linoleic acid emulsion assays.
Vitamin C and the linoleic acid in foods like oils and nuts may protect skin from aging, while carbohydrates and fats other than linoleic acid may make skin worse.